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2018 Conference on Medical Student Education

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Viewing sessions 21 through 40 of 301 sessions

P20 Merits of a 3-year MD Pathway Linked to Family Medicine Residency: Lessons Learned During Pilot Years

Michael Partin; Erin Cathcart, MPH, CPH

02/2/18 9:30 AM - 10:30 AM Austin Grand Ballroom J-K

The 3-year Accelerated Family Medicine Program at Penn State (3+3) combines accelerated medical education with residency to offer students an opportunity for continuity and longitudinal care. This also requires continuous review by students and faculty, to ensure adequate organization and communication. Implications of this reflective process include encouraging students to regularly participate in quality improvement practices and facilitating individualized, student-centered curricula. Trials, tribulations, and successes from this work could be transferred and applied to other accelerated medical education programs throughout the country. Continuous refinement of these programs has the potential to address physician shortages throughout the nation, specifically in primary care.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe the basic curricular framework of the Penn State Family Medicine Accelerated Program.
  2. Discuss the anticipated benefits of an accelerated curriculum in Family Medicine.
  3. Describe the advantages to continual quality improvement in a novel curriculum.

P21 Using the Hospital Discharge Summary as an Assessment Tool for Acting Interns at Albany Medical College

Jennifer Lee, MD; Ann Rutter, MD, MS

02/2/18 9:30 AM - 10:30 AM Austin Grand Ballroom J-K

Discharge summaries are a crucial communication tool between hospital and primary care providers. Despite multiple studies indicating the necessity of increased training, few residents or medical students receive training in this skill. More so, summarizing the hospital course provides an excellent opportunity for medical educators to assess a learner's understanding of key events in a patient's hospitalization. At Albany Medical Center, we have demonstrated that a brief training for first-year residents and a standardized template for discharge summaries helps to improve both comfort and competence in composition of hospital discharge summaries. We feel strongly that if we expect first-year residents to be skilled in this area, education surrounding this should begin prior to the start of residency. In order to accomplish this goal, we have adapted training materials to teach fourth-year medical students completing acting internships in family medicine, pediatrics, and internal medicine how to write a hospital discharge summary.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Review the patient safety and medical student education literature surrounding the topic of hospital discharge summaries
  2. Present a novel curriculum to teach fourth year medical students how to write a hospital discharge summary
  3. Discuss how to use the hospital discharge summary as an assessment tool for fourth year medical students

 

P22 Giving Credit Where Credit is Due: Creation of a For-Credit FMIG Elective for Preclinical Students

Michelle Nemetz; Tomoko Sairenji, MD, MSc; Jeanne Cawse, MD

02/2/18 9:30 AM - 10:30 AM Austin Grand Ballroom J-K

The University of Washington School of Medicine (UWSOM) Family Medicine Interest Group (FMIG) developed a for-credit, skills-based curriculum for preclinical medical students. The goal of this program was to promote interest in family medicine, allow students a way to explore the broad scope of practice in family medicine, and introduce new skills. This was the first for-credit elective created that was hands-on and skill-based for preclinical students. Each session was taught by a different regional family medicine residency (six total). This was an additional benefit for preclinical students to interact and network with residents, faculty, and residency directors. The class was capped to 40 students, divided between two sessions, which led to rich, small instructor-student ratios. Each day started with a lunch panel provided by visiting residents and faculty on family medicine residency topics and ended with a question and answer session. This poster shows the design and implementation of this program with results showing positive student course evaluations consisting of both qualitative and quantitative metrics.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. On completion of this session, the participants should be able to describe an example of an FMIG elective.
  2. On completion of this session, the participants should be able to discuss the pros and cons of using FMIG workshops as a course.
  3. On completion of this session, the participants should be able to begin planning how to collaborate with FM residency programs in FMIG events.

P23 The Value of Refugees as Standardized Patients and Interpreters for Interprofessional Education: A Pilot Study (STU)

Denise McGuigan, MSEd; Thomas Feeley; Kim Griswold, MD, MPH; Isok Kim, PhD; Timothy Servoss, PhD; May Shogan; Karen Zinnerstrom

02/2/18 9:30 AM - 10:30 AM Austin Grand Ballroom J-K

The United States remains one of the foremost countries accepting individuals and families fleeing global persecution and violence. Resettled refugees face barriers in accessing primary health care due to lack of provider cultural awareness and limited English proficiency (LEP). We designed a standardized patient (SP) project to train students from nursing, medicine and social work to work with interpreters and interact with refugees from different cultures who have LEP. Students participated in a medical encounter with an interpreter and refugee SP. SP/interpreters completed checklists assessing student communication skills and professionalism. Students completed pre/post evaluations addressing confidence level and attitude toward patients with LEP. Focus groups of students as well as SPs were conducted to obtain participants' perception of the activity and interaction with one another. Preliminary results indicate the SP encounter served to bolster the confidence of some students while revealing apparent gaps in training for others. Social work and medical students showed increases in confidence while nursing students exhibited decreases in overall confidence. Ratings of student performance by SPs and their interpreters were positive (>4 out of 5). SPs rated student performance significantly higher than the interpreters F(1,26)=5.34, P=.029. This poster describes the development, implementation and evaluation of this project.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. After viewing this poster, participants should be able to facilitate interprofessional education among students in training that will be working together to form future healthcare teams.
  2. After viewing this poster, participants should be able to learn from refugees and interpreters how best to use an interpreter effectively.
  3. After viewing this poster, participants should be able to analyze their ability to communicate effectively with Standardized Patients using an interpreter and enhance cultural understanding of students about refugee patients.

P24 Empathy: Can It Be Taught and Can It Be Measured? (STU)

Carol Park; Margaret Morrison, MD; Janet McMahon, BA; Linda Chang, PharmD, MPH

02/2/18 9:30 AM - 10:30 AM Austin Grand Ballroom J-K

The overarching goal of the University of Illinois College of Medicine at Rockford's Essentials of Patient Care (EPC) course is to increase empathy in second-year medical students for patients through focusing on both the social determinants of health and the cultural competency components of the curriculum. Specifically, the EPC course aims to increase these medical students' awareness of the types of barriers that patients must overcome to achieve optimized health care and to help students to appreciate that approaching patients must include consideration of the community, environment, family, and cultural competency. This poster session shares with the audience the overall structure of the curriculum currently used for this course, such as small group activities, an explanation of how the course hours are used, and assessment strategies. It will also explain the unique components of the course and how it can be used to teach medical students about empathy.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. explain why empathy is an important part of medical education.
  2. describe the different components of the University of Illinois College of Medicine at Rockford's empathy curriculum.
  3. describe the results of this study.

P25 Using and Assessing SBIRT and MI to Enhance Communication in Health Care and Health Literacy in the Family Medicine Accelerated Track

David Trotter, PhD; Shyla Arismendez, RN; Aaron Chen; Judy Dewitt; David Fields; Dominique Gagnon; Seferino Gomez; Zoie Walker; Jacob Hall; Felix Morales, MD; Kim Peck, MD; Betsy Jones, EdD

02/2/18 9:30 AM - 10:30 AM Austin Grand Ballroom J-K

Purpose: Our institution has a 3-year MD curriculum leading to family medicine residency. An 8-week systems-based course between the M1 and M2 years includes Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) and motivational interviewing (MI) training to enhance communication about substance misuse. This special initiative assesses whether (1) students develop proficiency in the use of SBIRT and MI; (2) they can employ techniques in clinical settings; and (3) SBIRT and MI are effective relative to other modalities. Methods: At the beginning of the 2017 Family Medicine Accelerated Training (FMAT) 1 course, students measured their baseline knowledge and skills. Over the course of the summer, and climaxing in the neuropsychiatry week, they will track and assess the use of communication tools to assess health behavior risk (including risk related to substance use), engender behavior change, and promote shared decision making. Results: As a self-directed learning activity, students will be engaged in identifying, analyzing, and synthesizing information relevant to their learning needs about effective communication strategies in primary care settings. Conclusions: This poster highlights the activity's key characteristics and evaluation results. Development of the poster and data gathering will be largely driven by the M2 students enrolled in the program. The poster provides learning outcomes and student perspectives about the use of SBIRT and MI in medical student teaching sessions and its effectiveness as an opportunity for innovative self-directed learning.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Define SBIRT (Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment) and MI (Motivational Interviewing)
  2. Describe the implementation of SBIRT and MI as techniques to enhance communication skills in healthcare & health literacy within a 3-year accelerated track
  3. Assess students' ability to identify, analyze, and synthesize information relevant to their learning needs about effective communication strategies in primary care settings

P26 A Preceptor Site Initiative to Teach Family Medicine Clerkship Students to Enter Orders in the EHR

Bibin Varghese; William Huang, MD; Susan Nash, PhD; Nidhi Mehrotra; Anjali Aggarwal, MD

02/2/18 9:30 AM - 10:30 AM Austin Grand Ballroom J-K

PURPOSE: Our previous research has shown that only a minority of clerkship students enter orders and prescriptions in the electronic health record (EHR). We present one preceptor site initiative to help students learn to enter orders and prescriptions in the EHR. METHODS: In week 1, the student follows the traditional model, performing a focused history and physical independently before presenting findings to the attending, who enters the appropriate orders. In weeks 2 through 4, the student sees the patient independently, using available clinical decision support tools or online evidence-based resources, and enters unsigned orders in the EHR. The student presents the pertinent history and physical findings, and the attending reviews the unsigned orders and signs, removes, or corrects the orders. The number of orders entered by the student is tracked and categorized as correct, incomplete, or incorrect. The student questionnaires and the number of correct, incorrect, and incomplete orders will be tracked over the 4 weeks and the results plotted. RESULTS: We expect to have 15 to 18 complete sets of student questionnaires at the time of presentation. We will present our analysis of data over the course of the clerkship, noting the changes that occur from week to week. We anticipate students will gain both confidence and accuracy in entering orders. CONCLUSION: Discussion focuses on lessons learned and future directions.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. List three challenges to student learning regarding entry of orders in the EHR.
  2. Review available clinical decision support tools or online evidence-based resources that can be used by clerkship students.
  3. Describe an innovative strategy for teaching order entry in the EHR for family medicine clerkship students

P27 Using a Student-Constructed Heart Model to Teach EKG Axis and Cardiac Anatomy (STU)

Melissa Martinez, MD; Seth Hunter; Robert Courtney; Michelle Bardack, MD; Rebecca Hartley

02/2/18 9:30 AM - 10:30 AM Austin Grand Ballroom J-K

Purpose: Reading an EKG is not intuitive. How do the lines on an EKG relate to the electrical axis of the heart? Why does axis matter? One way to learn about heart axis is to memorize, another is to acquire a deeper understanding of how EKG leads relate to heart anatomy. In this IRB-approved study, students constructed a clay heart model and were challenged to show how heart depolarization interacts with EKG leads. Pre- and posttests assessed knowledge acquired during this interactive, student-directed exercise as compared to a group of students attending a lecture on EKG axis. We hypothesized that participants in the activity would acquire more knowledge compared to the lecture. Methods: Fifty first-year students attended an optional session during the cardiovascular block. Students took a pretest on EKG axis and myocardial infarction. They were randomized to a lecture or the activity. After the lecture/activity, students took a posttest and self-efficacy survey. Next, lecture attendees participated in the activity, and activity attendees had the lecture. An exit survey was conducted after the both groups had the lecture and the activity. Results: Students in both groups increased their scores (+8 for activity and +13 for lecture) and self-efficacy (0.5 and 1 for activity and lecture). Seventy-nine percent of students recommended that both the activity and lecture be repeated in the future. Conclusions: The activity was not superior for knowledge acquisition or efficacy compared to lecture. Both were well received by students. More direction from facilitators and time for students with the models may increase the efficacy of the activity. Next steps: We will redesign the activity to better guide students in a step-by-step understanding of cardiac axis and EKG.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. On completion of this session, the participants should be able to construct a heart model using clay, spaghetti for leads and string candy for coronary arteries.

  2. On completion of this session, the participants should be able to state three reasons why the activity did not appear to be superior to the lecture.

  3. List three cardiac topics that could be taught using a student constructed heart model.

P28 Quality Improvement Initiative to Identify Barriers to Care For Transitional Care Visits

Munima Nasir, MD; Eric Messner, MSN, PhD, FNP-BC; KieuHanh Nugyen

02/2/18 9:30 AM - 10:30 AM Austin Grand Ballroom J-K

This quality improvement project is to identify and seek to address barriers to care for family and community medicine patients for whom follow-up care visits, or transition of care (TOC) visits are indicated, yet who ultimately do not undergo a TOC visit. To identify barriers related to TOC visits, patient data that is captured during the routine course of clinical care within the existing electronic medical record system and billing record system will be reviewed. The patient cohort will consist of family and community medicine patients who have been discharged within the last year with a TOC visit indicated at 7 or 14 days after discharge, who did not have a subsequent TOC visit according to billing records. Those patient records will be further reviewed to determine, if the TOC did not occur, what the barriers might have been. A closer analysis of these findings may allow the investigators to determine quality improvement initiatives to address the specified barriers. Addressing such barriers to care will not only ensure that patients are able to access the medical care they need in a timely manner, but it will also contribute toward the realization of departmental/institutional goals of reducing 7-day, 30-day, and 90-day patient readmission rates. The project engages the Penn State College of Medicine's unique accelerated 3+3 family and community medicine clerkship students with a quality improvement initiative at the very beginning of their medical school training.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. On completion of this session, the participants should be able to: define and describe their current process for transitions of care.
  2. On completion of this session, the participants should be able to: identify current members of their transition of care teams.
  3. On completion of this session, the participants should be able to: identify potential barriers to successful transition of care visits.

P29 Empowering Students to Implement Change in Primary Care: A Student-Driven Quality Improvement Project Experience (STU)

Carolyn Coyle; Jennifer Raley, MD

02/2/18 9:30 AM - 10:30 AM Austin Grand Ballroom J-K

The aim of this session is to describe the structure, student experience, and results of an innovative quality improvement project curriculum conducted through UTMB's Student Continuity of Practice Experience (SCOPE) Program. The SCOPE program is a longitudinal primary care experience with an overarching purpose to foster consistent, positive patient/provider relationships and demonstrate the rewards of primary care practice. It extends across all four years of the curriculum. In the third year of participation, students are expected to create and implement a quality improvement (QI) project in their respective clinics on teams with their peers and with the guidance of faculty. Projects range from efforts to improve colon cancer screening rates and diabetic foot exams to improving at-home reading exposure in pediatric populations. A review of the experience and results has highlighted the benefits of early exposure to QI training while also identifying potential areas of improvement for future iterations of the QI project to ensure it provides value for all students, staff, and patients involved.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe the basic components and structure of a medical student QI curriculum
  2. Describe the various benefits of early QI training and implementation for medical students
  3. Identify the challenges of implementing a student-driven QI project and strategies to address these barriers

P30 Comprehensive Diabetes Care: A Glimpse Into Primary Care Practices Across Connecticut

Rana Alkhaldi; Khuram Ghumman, MD, MPH, CPE

02/2/18 9:30 AM - 10:30 AM Austin Grand Ballroom J-K

Comprehensive type 2 diabetes treatment requires ongoing preventive care as well as patient education. We, a group of 11 third-year medical students, decided to examine how diverse primary care practices across Connecticut monitor their diabetic patients, particularly focusing on specific screening tools for prevention of disease progression. We conducted a retrospective chart review of 67 patients with type 2 diabetes across 11 primary care practices within Connecticut. Using the Diabetes Visit Assessment Tool from the American Diabetes Association, we determined whether the following screening tests were performed over the past year for each patient: hemoglobin A1C, blood pressure, fasting lipid panels, urine microalbumin, comprehensive foot exams, lifestyle modification recommendations, medication reconciliation, and dilated eye exams. Descriptive statistics were performed for each screening parameter and reported in percentage of patients. Overall, we found that PCP clinics consistently monitor HbA1C and blood pressure and conduct thorough medication reconciliations (100% of patients). They regularly perform foot exams (97%), check fasting lipid panels (95.5%), and recommend lifestyle changes (93%). However, urine microalbumin and dilated eye exams need to be followed more closely (65.7% and 34%, respectively). Therefore, we recommend a letter-to-consultant process or call-back system to improve communication between primary care physicians and ophthalmologists.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Identify areas of strength and of weakness for preventive care in type 2 diabetes management
  2. Discuss the importance of preventive screening assessments in management of type 2 diabetes
  3. Examine the role and utility of primary care-oriented group projects in self-directed learning for third-year medical students

P31 The Intersection of Food Insecurity and Nutrition: Overview of a Novel Course for Interprofessional Students (STU)

Anita Ramsetty, MD; Cristin Adams, DO

02/2/18 9:30 AM - 10:30 AM Austin Grand Ballroom J-K

In the fall of 2016, a novel course was launched at the Medical University of South Carolina: Caring for the Community- Focus on Food. The course aimed to address a major deficiency in the interprofessional student curriculum: clinical nutrition. However, the course was novel in its focus on food insecurity, with the overlying premise that in order to adequately perform nutrition counselling or address food insecurity, an individual needed a foundational understanding of both. In our nation, food insecurity affects 13% of all households including 5% who experience very low food security. In South Carolina, the rate of food insecurity statewide was 18% in 2015 (latest stats report this is now 16%) with the total child food insecurity rate of 28%. In a state where diabetes, hypertension and obesity are also extremely common, it is imperative that students and professionals be able to counsel their patients on nutrition basics while taking into account food insecurity within the household. This session aims to discuss both major foci of the course, and allow participants to experience some of the exercises performed in class.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. On completion of this session, the participants should be able to build curricular components that will address student knowledge of food insecurity
  2. On completion of this session the participants should be able to utilize accepted screening tools for food insecurity and basic nutrition assessment in the general population.
  3. On completion of this session the participants should be able to complete and incorporate a SNAP budget exercise into their teaching curriculum for trainees.

P32 The Impact of a Medical Student-Developed Standardized Health Curriculum Geared Toward Socioeconomically Disadvantaged Patients in the Hampton Roads Region of Virginia on Patient Knowledge of Nutrition, Healthy Living, and Wellness (STU)

Catherine Pang; Meghna Chopra; Kimberly Ha; Raghav Malik; Christine Matson, MD

02/2/18 9:30 AM - 10:30 AM Austin Grand Ballroom J-K

Medical students in the Choosing Healthy Options for Wellness (CHOW) service learning group at Eastern Virginia Medical School (EVMS) designed an evidence-based health and wellness curriculum in collaboration with the American Heart Association (AHA) that is localized to free clinics and community centers at Chesapeake and Norfolk, Virginia. The active-learning course, implemented four times in the academic year, is geared toward socioeconomically disadvantaged patients with obesity, diabetes, and/or hypertension. Topics that the medical students will present include exercise types and implementation into daily life, AHA-approved cooking techniques that support healthy living, and discussion-based education on lifestyle choices that improve nutritional outcomes. Upon curriculum completion, patients are expected to achieve exercise as a regular habit, create home-cooked meals supported by the AHA, and utilize their knowledge of nutrition, finances, and habits to improve their health and overall well-being.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Assist in educating patients in their own communities about evidence-based health and wellness specific to exercise, cooking, and nutrition.
  2. Improve health outcomes in patient populations through continued modification of the CHOW curriculum to suit the specific needs of their communities.
  3. Reinforce their own knowledge of health and nutrition through creating and presenting a health and wellness curriculum suited to their local communities.

 

P33 Student Perceptions of an Interprofessional Student-Run Free Clinic (STU)

Peia Lee ; Sumanth Reddy; Ashley Higbea, PharmD; Patti Pagels, MPAS, PA; Adebola Adesoye

02/2/18 9:30 AM - 10:30 AM Austin Grand Ballroom J-K

Purpose: Determine student's attitudes about interprofessional teams and team approach to care within a student-run interprofessional clinic. Methods: The student-run clinic primarily consists of medical students, PA students, pre-medical students, and most recently pharmacy students. The students provide collaborative care one evening a week at a men’s homeless shelter. This clinic serves to fill a gap in acute care needs until patients can see their primary care provider, and also prevents unnecessary ER visits for minor ailments. At the end of the clinic, students voluntarily fill out a survey that consists of the SPICE-R2 Instrument that assesses attitudes toward interprofessional teams and the team approach to care. The survey also consists of questions for non-pharmacy students to fill out regarding their experiences collaborating with the newly integrated pharmacy students. Pharmacy students are currently only in clinic every other week due to limited resources, and results of when pharmacy students are present will be compared to when they are not present in clinic. Results OR Expected Results: We expect that interprofessional teams that include pharmacy students will have a positive affect on student's attitudes about interprofessional teams and the team approach to care. We also expect medical, PA, and pre-med students will find pharmacy students on a healthcare team valuable to their interprofessional educational experience. Conclusions OR Challenges to completion of this project: The survey is voluntary. Thus, if participants are limited, the project may need to continue for a longer period to make a conclusion.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Define interprofessional education and collaborative practice
  2. Describe student's attitudes about interprofessional teams and team approach to care within a student-run interprofessional clinic
  3. Identify the value pharmacy students have within an interprofessional team

P34 Assessing Barriers to Care: Investigating the Needs of Super-Utilizer Patients in a Suburban Setting (STU)

Eric Messner, MSN, PhD, FNP-BC; Alexis Reedy-Cooper, MPH, MD; Connor Carmichael; Rebecca King

02/2/18 9:30 AM - 10:30 AM Austin Grand Ballroom J-K

This research aims to identify common barriers that super-utilizer patients experience in inpatient and outpatient settings that could increase their risk for rehospitalization. This is the first study of super-utilizers outside of an urban underserved area, in a suburban-rural population of patients who are admitted to a medical center directly affiliated with their assigned primary care provider. Using a mixed methods approach that includes medical record reviews, survey measures, and semistructured at-home interviews, the researchers seek to characterize the patient population and identify commonly experienced barriers to care for super-utilizers empaneled within family and community medicine at Penn State Health. The study cohort includes 10 randomly selected patients with three or more hospitalizations in the past 180 days. Each participant completes the Single Item Literacy Screener, Patient Activation Measure, and Morisky medication adherence measure. Data on each participant's health care utilization is abstracted from their electronic health record. Participants also take part in a video-recorded at-home interview with a series of semistructured questions about their life and health care experiences. Mixed methods analyses will consider relationships across diagnoses, time intervals, utilization patterns, transition care plans, and levels of health literacy, patient activation, and medication adherence.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. On completion of this session, the participants should be able to discuss patient-reported reasons for frequent hospitalizations in a population of high utilizer patients in an attempt to optimize patient health services and health care delivery.
  2. On completion of this session, the participants should be able to delineate the benefits and potential limitations for the use of semi-structured interviews to qualitatively analyze actual and perceived barriers to care when screening patients to enhance health promotion.
  3. On completion of this session, the participants should be able to discuss implications for future care including ways to mitigate perceived or actual barriers to care and encourage patient engagement in similar suburban populations.

P35 Educating the Public About Osteopathic Medicine: RowanSOM’s Innovative Approach

Pamela DeWilde; Patrick Chadd, Ed.D

02/2/18 9:30 AM - 10:30 AM Austin Grand Ballroom J-K

There are few resources available to help educate potential medical students, members of the health care community, and the public about osteopathic medicines and the implication of osteopathic manipulative medicine (OMM). RowanSOM, Rowan Global, and a group of very dedicated students created an online course to fill this gap and facilitate a better understanding of the history, methods, and unique approach provided by osteopathic physicians. The course also challenges the student to think about how health care is delivered and its impact on the patient experience. There have been over 1,500 enrollees with passionate and thought-provoking discussion amongst the students. This course allows us a small look into the pervasive potential of a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) and its ability to educate the public about osteopathic medicine and its role in health care.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. On completion of this session, the participants should be able to describe the basic concept of and purpose of a MOOC (massive open online course) , with more specific insight into how it was utilized to educate the public about Osteopathic Medicine.
  2. On completion of this session, the participants should be able to gain confidence that with proper collaboration, creating an educational tool of this size can be done with ease.
  3. On completion of this session, the participants should be able to appreciate that our course about Osteopathic Medicine, presented in this MOOC format, has been widely utilized by participants from various backgrounds who have provided excellent feedback.

P36 Medical Students' Perceptions of LGBTQ* Medical Education (STU)

Jessica Adkins; Rachel Looff; Keisa Fallin, MD, MPH

02/2/18 9:30 AM - 10:30 AM Austin Grand Ballroom J-K

The lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer/questioning (LGBTQ*) community continues to face bias in the health care system that contributes to their increased risk for health disparities. Current literature indicates that education of providers can mitigate health disparities, but that education at most schools is lacking. The purpose of this project was to evaluate first- and fourth-year medical students' perceptions concerning LGBTQ*-specific medical education at the University of Kentucky. With this poster presentation, we will discuss the results at our institution, draw some comparisons to the extant literature, and engage in discussions surrounding implementation of appropriate types and quantity of LGBTQ* education in medical school.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe the perceptions of medical student participants concerning the importance of and quality of LGBTQ* education.
  2. Describe the preferences of medical student participants concerning effectiveness of various methods of LGBTQ* education.
  3. Discuss the implications of various strategies for incorporating more or higher quality LGBTQ* education for students at their own institutions.

P37 The Impact of an Interprofessional Student-Run Free Clinic: How Students Perceive Interprofessional Care and the Underserved (STU)

Lindsay Yang; Tung Nguyen; Jonathan Hwang; Grace Cho; Magen Slater; Kai Wen Cheng; Michelle Hao; Allie Schmiesing; Kristyl Felix; Kevin Luu; Christopher Forest, MSHS, PAC

02/2/18 9:30 AM - 10:30 AM Austin Grand Ballroom J-K

Service learning through interprofessional (IP) student-run free clinics has been suggested as a method of achieving IP competencies and attitudes toward the underserved, but the outcomes of this educational model have not been established. The University of Southern California (USC) Student-Run Clinic (SRC) implemented a student survey to test if the experience of team-based care in an IP student-run clinic positively impacts student attitudes toward IP care and the underserved. From September 2015 through June 2017, 344 unique surveys were completed, of which 116 were students of medicine (34%), 48 physician assistant (PA) (14%), 136 pharmacy (40%), 44 occupational therapy (OT) (13%). PA students had higher pre- and postsurvey scores than any other group on 13/14 questions. All professions felt their profession was more willing to share information after. Although OT (P-value=0.04) and PA (P-value=0.003) students felt health care students should become involved in community health efforts, no profession had significant changes when asked if they personally wanted to become involved in providing care for the medically needy during their career. The data show that an IP student-run clinic can positively impact or reinforce student attitudes toward both interdisciplinary care and the underserved in some settings, such as sharing information or involvement as a community. These changes in attitude though may not significantly extend to a personal commitment to the medically needy.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Acquire expectations for the degree of impact an interprofessional student run clinic can have on student attitudes toward interprofessional care and the underserved.
  2. Create sustainable, internal measures evaluating how student attitudes change after volunteering at their student run clinic through pre- and post-surveys.
  3. Develop or adjust a protocol for an interprofessional student run clinic that incorporates Medicine, Physician Assistant, Pharmacy, and Occupational Therapy programs.

P38 Improving Engagement Between Health Care Providers and Community Resources: The Goal of a Novel Interprofessional Course

Anita Ramsetty, MD; Cristin Adams, DO

02/2/18 9:30 AM - 10:30 AM Austin Grand Ballroom J-K

Caring for the Community is a course presented at the Medical University of South Carolina. Initially based on the student experience at our student-run free clinic, after 10 years the course was completely revised. The current overlying goal of the course is to foster community engagement for future providers, making them more self sufficient in their knowledge and ability to direct patients to needed resources. Currently the model of provider engagement limits their involvement to medical needs and limits that of addressing social needs, the latter of which directly influence the former. More obvious links include food insecurity and literacy. For the past year the revised course has built its core on presentations and seminars led by invited community program representatives. Student feedback this year shows self-perceived improvement in their knowledge of community resources as well as their confidence in being able to refer patients to the appropriate agencies.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Make direct links between social determinants of health to common chronic health conditions in their community
  2. Outline curricular topics to be considered for inclusion in a course directed at improving student knowledge of community resources that are applicable to the local population
  3. Formulate an effective framework for more involvement of community representatives/leaders in student course work devoted to learning about social determinants of health

P39 The Bronx Community Health Leaders (BxCHL): A Year-Round Premed Program at an Academic Family Medicine FQHC to Increase Diversity in Primary Care Workforce

Juan Robles, MD; Julissa De La Cruz; Omar Sanon

02/2/18 9:30 AM - 10:30 AM Austin Grand Ballroom J-K

African Americans and Hispanics comprise only about 4% of the US physician workforce, while they make up approximately 30% of US population. Bronx Community Health Leaders (BxCHL) is premed pipeline program, created in 2014 by a small group of prehealth scholars and two family physicians. BxCHL provides opportunities for youth from communities that have been traditionally underrepresented in health care professions. It nurtures leadership development and community service essential to care for underserved populations. Students are increasingly more knowledgeable about family medicine and the role family physicians in delivery of primary care in underserved areas. BxCHL members that have been accepted to medical school have reported continued interest in pursuing primary care including family medicine as a career option. Academic family medicine health centers can lead the way in nurturing homegrown health care professionals

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. identify the core components and organizational structure of a sustainable pre-health pipeline program at an academic family medicine health center
  2. examine the role of a family physician in a sustainable pre-health pipeline program
  3. identify opportunities and barriers to implementing a sustainable pre-health pipeline program


Copyright 2018 by Society of Teachers of Family Medicine