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2019 Conference on Medical Student Education

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FDD1 Now You’re the Learner: A Faculty Development Experience in Team-Based Learning

James Tysinger, PhD; Stephen A. Wilson, MD, MPH, FAAFP

01/31/19 12:30 PM - 5:30 PM

Family medicine faculty develop curricula for, and teach medical students and residents using a variety of instructional methods. STFM Faculty Development Delivered (FDD) exists to enhance faculty knowledge and skills so they can better perform their roles. In this first FDD preconference workshop, participants will experience team-based learning (TBL) by completing guided readings before the session, completing an assessment exercise at the preconference, and working as a team to develop the outline for a curriculum on a timely topic in undergraduate and graduate medical education. Using Kern’s Six-Step Curriculum Development Process, teams develop needs assessments, write goals and objectives, select appropriate instructional methods, propose an implementation plan, and identify practical ways to evaluate and revise the curriculum so it can be disseminated as scholarly activity. Participants will share their curriculum outlines with workshop colleagues to identify ways to improve their plans. Participants will return to their departments and programs equipped to develop and/or improve curricula and teach their peers what they have learned. Participants will have the option of continuing to work with their workshop team to continue to develop and disseminate their curriculum. Instructional Methods: Team-Based Learning, Mini-Lecture, Coaching, Participant Presentations. Note: This workshop is limited to attendance, and includes a pre-workshop homework assignment.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Given the Kern Six-Step Approach for Curriculum Development and specific elements to include in the curriculum, develop and present an outline for the curriculum to workshop participants.
  2. Given goals and objectives and the advantages and disadvantages of an array of instructional methods, select one or more effective instructional methods for presenting the content to learners.
  3. Specify ways to identify struggling learners’ needs and use instructional strategies to help the learners succeed.

PR1 There’s an App for That: Using Technology to Improve Teaching, Scholarship, and Wellness—Tools for Academic and Home Life!

Joanna Drowos, DO, MPH, MBA; Peter Averkiou, MD; Laurie Belknap, DO, MS.MedL; Chivon Brown Stubbs; Amanda Chiplock; Ronald Cook, DO, MBA; Matthew Holley, PhD; Kristen Hood Watson, MD; David Kelley, MD; Peter Koopman, MD; Lisa Martinez; Parvathi Perumareddi; Nirmala Prakash; Mandi Sehgal, MD; Srikala Yedavally-Yellayi, DO

01/31/19 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM

The current responsibilities of family medicine educators are at times overwhelming. A range of technological support tools exist to improve the experience or efficiency of activities common to the academic family medicine community. Specific tools and strategies can use technology to improve the delivery and efficiency of teaching, enhance academic organization and collaboration for promotion, as well as supporting personal wellness. Goals have been developed for three break-out groups, titled "Technology Tips to Improve Teaching and Engaging Learners, Technology Tips for Academic Promotion and Productivity, and Technology Tips for Communication and Balance." Each of these sessions will include interactive instruction in certain tools and strategies, as well as collecting additional tools and strategies from participants in each session. Participants are encouraged to bring their own smartphones, tablets, and laptops in order to be able to practice during the sessions. Following the three breakouts there will be an opportunity to engage in practice with new tools learned, as well as sharing of apps beneficial in clinical practice or teaching. The conclusion will include a summary of new tools and strategies discovered, as well as setting of personal goals to utilize technology in the areas covered. Participants will leave the workshop with a plan to use some of these tools to support their roles as educators and clinicians, having hands-on practice with various tools.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Identify and utilize technologic tools and strategies to improve their teaching delivery, such as improved presentation skills and approaches to interactive learning;
  2. Identify and utilize technologic tools to promote academic collaboration, support academic advancement and organize scholarly projects;
  3. Identify and utilize technologic tools to promote personal resilience, personal health and allow better personal and family communication.

PR2 From Probe to Skin: A Complete Point of Care Ultrasound (POCUS) Curriculum for Medical Students

James Daniels II, MD; Alec DeCastro, MD; Greg Havermale; Erica Miller-Spears, PA; Rachel Rahman, MD

01/31/19 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM

This session is for anyone interested or responsible for integrating point of care ultrasound (POCUS) into a medical school curriculum. This session will be 4 hours in length. The first part will be interactive where the participants will be broken into small groups to tackle subjects such as “faculty buy-in,” funding programs, and how to add this information to an already over-crowded curriculum. The second half of the program will involve the participants scanning in small groups and no prior scanning experience is necessary. The participants will be given eight specific scans “that every doctor should know.” There will be time to practice scanning and for those who already have scanning skills, there will be discussion on teaching techniques and other tricks to help teach the material to learners. This program is from a number of medical schools who have already integrated this material. The faculty assisting in this workshop have published two books on this subject and have given this presentation regionally and nationally to attending physicians, resident physicians, athletic trainers, and physician assistants.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Develop a plan and “elevator speech” to get faculty buy-in and funding for POCUS;
  2. Identify and discriminate between the different types of scanners/probes and be able to select a machine for their program;
  3. Use the eight scanning protocols every doctor should know to teach medical students POCUS.

P01 Partnering With the Council of Academic Family Medicine (CAFM), Family Medicine for America’s Health, and Area Health Education Centers (AHECs) to Increase Student Choice of Family Medicine

Michelle Roett, MD, MPH, FAAFP, CPE; Julie Graves, MD, MPH, PhD; Donna Cameron, PhD, MPH

02/1/19 9:30 AM - 10:30 AM

Longitudinal mentoring, preceptorship, and early exposure to amily Medicine in the educational and career choice process strengthens the pathway for medical students to choose family medicine careers. Partnering with the CAFM, FMAH, other primary care departments, our school’s Office of Diversity and Inclusion, pipeline programs, and our community, the Department of Family Medicine at Georgetown University School of Medicine was named the Area Health Education Center for the District of Columbia and awarded a 5-year, $1.25 million grant. Building on a successful community-based learning curriculum and the partnerships with community organizations developed over several years, and on university and medical school programs that brought high school and college students on campus, we developed a proposal that awards scholarships for medical and nursing students who plan primary care careers, links high school, college, and medical students with primary care physician mentors, trains mentors, and hosts students for funded summer research opportunities. Many family medicine residencies work with AHECs. Taking this concept further, bringing the strengths of the AHEC community to support mentoring and experiential learning about family medicine to high school, college students, and preclinical medical students enhances student choice of family medicine careers. Working with a school of nursing on the grant application process has led to interprofessional education initiatives.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Target funding requests for pipeline programs (high school, college or premed, medical school) in medical education accurately;
  2. Design an approach to collaborating with academic or community partners (eg, AHEC, other schools of medicine, health systems) on mentoring programs that promote growth of the primary care workforce;
  3. Partner with nursing education programs for interprofessional mentoring and educational programs.

P02 Camp Family Med: Can a Family Medicine Summer Clinical Experience Help Recruit M1 Students to the Specialty?

Amanda Allmon, MD; Priyanka Prabhu; Sarah Swofford, MD, MSPH

02/1/19 9:30 AM - 10:30 AM

Like other family medicine departments out there, the University of Missouri is exploring all opportunities to recruit students to family medicine. Exposure to family medicine early in medical school seems to be important to student choice. We decided to begin a 4-week Family Medicine Summer Clinical Experience between the first and second years of medical school. The experience allows up to four students the opportunity to work one-on-one with residents and faculty. Our department is committed to providing high quality, patient-centered care to a diverse patient population that includes pregnant women, children, adults, and the elderly. Our hope is that spending time over the summer will expose the students to the core concepts of family medicine, including a broad-spectrum approach to primary care that considers the impact of social determinants of health, community factors, and the complex health care system that our patients interact with. In this session, we will discuss the structure of our Summer Clinical Experience and review highlights and challenges we’ve encountered. We will provide copies of student schedules and explain the organization behind the learning opportunities provided to the summer students. A medical student that completed the program will be present to discuss her experience and answer audience questions. We will also discuss opportunities for ongoing mentorship that develop out of this summer experience.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Design a family medicine summer clinical experience for their institution;
  2. Anticipate challenges for developing such a program at their institution and propose solutions for those challenges;
  3. Incorporate medical student feedback to help in the design of their summer clinical experience.

P03 One WisCARES: An Innovative Interprofesional Partnership to Improve Outcomes for Persons Experiencing Homelessness

Bethany Howlett, MD, MHS; William Gilles; Eric Howlett

02/1/19 9:30 AM - 10:30 AM

A 2016 needs assessment designed by the UW Department of Family Medicine and Community Health and Madison Area Care for the Homeless identified barriers to health services for persons experiencing housing insecurity in Dane County, WI. These included the inability to afford care, insufficient transportation, mistrust of the health care system, and fear of being judged. Bridging the health care gap created by structural and cultural barriers for persons experiencing homelessness would require innovative community-based approaches, such as those offered through Wisconsin Companion Animal Resources, Education, and Social Services (WisCARES). Housed in the UW School of Veterinary Medicine in collaboration with UW health professional programs, WisCARES provides veterinary medical care, housing advocacy, health screening and education, and social support services to pet owners in Dane County who are experiencing or at risk of homelessness. By leveraging the relationship between humans and their companion animals, WisCARES is uniquely placed to connect clients to human medical services. The One WisCARES program also serves as an interdisciplinary teaching setting, where students of participating disciplines gain clinical training opportunities along with structured and unstructured forums to refine skills common across healthcare professions: communication, strategic thinking, team-based care, leadership, professional advocacy, emotional intelligence, and cultural humility.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Define the following key concepts: One Health, interdisciplinary, transdisciplinary, multidisciplinary; and describe how they can be incorporated into a health professional training curriculum;
  2. Identify the role and impact of the human-animal bond as it relates to community health and wellness;
  3. Demonstrate how to lead structured, intentional debriefing around the interdisciplinary team experience.

P04 Impact of Increased Class Size on Family Medicine Clerkship

Afolake Mobolaji, MD; Dolapo Babalola, MD, FAAFP; Rosalyn Stubbs; Bridgette Welch, MS-HRM

02/1/19 9:30 AM - 10:30 AM

In 2005, The Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) called on US medical schools to increase class size by 15% to 30% to address a projected shortage of physicians during the coming decades. According to the 2008 study commissioned by the Medical College of Georgia, the state of Georgia is on the verge of a crisis due to drought of physicians. “Without changes in the states medical education system, Georgia will rank last in the United states in physician per capita by 2020,” states the report. Therefore a historical lack of minority doctors and physicians serving underserved populations is one reason Morehouse School of Medicine started down the Road to 100—a lofty goal to increase the number of students enrolled in the MD degree-granting program. The family medicine clerkship therefore is impacted thus needed to create ways to accommodate the growing class size.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Create ways to continue to be effective in the delivery of quality medical education;
  2. Learn how to retain preceptors;
  3. Continue to exhibit professional behavior and commitment to excellence.

P05 A Deep Dive Into Social Mission for Medical Students

Betsy Jones, EdD; Ronald Cook, DO, MBA; Felix Morales, MD; Patti Patterson, MD

02/1/19 9:30 AM - 10:30 AM

The AAMC reminds us that academic medicine must focus on efforts to address health and health care inequities. But how best to expose medical students to social determinants of health, addressing the needs of special populations, and other issues that link students’ passion for helping others with their focus on developing clinical skills and knowledge? Our medical school has developed a course that spans the first 2 years of the curriculum and is delivered in an “interblock” format. Midway through the first semester, MS1 students participate in a week that serves as a deep dive into these topics. Students participate hands-on activities such as a poverty simulation, group visits to community organizations that serve populations in need, a discussion session on cultural competency and health literacy, a symposium on sex and gender differences in health as well as large and small break-out content sessions, and introduction to a long-term project focused on addressing population health. Pre- and postweek assessments show improvement on knowledge tests. We also see changes in students’ attitudes toward such issues as caring for the underserved, recognizing the causes of health inequity, and the role of poverty as a health determinant. This session will describe the P3 week. It will focus on how the course and week are organized, how students engage with community agencies and populations, what stakeholders are involved, and how learning is assessed.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe a doctoring course that uses 1-week intensive experiences and monthly small group activities to engage and mentor students and to focus on important themes;
  2. Evaluate the implementation of a 1-week experience for first-year medical students to address social determinants of health and social mission in health care;
  3. Apply strategies from a “deep dive into social mission” to design innovative student activities to engage with their peers and community

P06 Generation Y Partners Generate Independence

Nathan Bradford Sr, MD; Leigh Freeman; Paige Kozlowski

02/1/19 9:30 AM - 10:30 AM

Young people with disabilities represent a vulnerable population. They are faced with many challenges including transition to adult medical care. Medical students are a valuable resource to partner with this group of patients. Medical students in our institution devised a project whereby they collected a registry of young people with special health care needs who were graduating from a large pediatric practice. The students met with the patient at their last exit visit from pediatric care, at which time they assembled medical history and filled out a "transition readiness checklist." They then navigated each patient through the process of becoming a new patient at the family medicine center across town. At the new patient entrance visit they again reviewed medical history with the patient and new provider, and reviewed the readiness checklist again. At the conclusion the students wrote reflective pieces describing what they learned about disabilities, self-advocacy, and independence.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Overcome challenges in transition for young people with special health care needs;
  2. Construct a project pairing students with patients with disabilities to improve independence;
  3. Arrange for patients with disabilities to teach medical learners about independence.

P07 Clinical Ultrasonography as Part of Clinical Skills Teaching

Lisa Martinez; Philip Cualing; Mario Jacomino, MD, MPH; Dayna Weinert, MD

02/1/19 9:30 AM - 10:30 AM

Point of care ultrasound, or clinical ultrasonography, is when a provider caring for a patient utilizes ultrasound technology at the bedside to aide in assessment and diagnosis. It has become a more frequent occurrence in clinical medicine over the last decade, and can be safely used as an adjunct to the physical examination. However, ultrasound, unlike other forms of imaging, is very user-dependent and requires training to obtain accurate images. Furthermore, use of ultrasound in undergraduate medical education can aide in the retention of anatomic learning and clinical skills performance. Introducing students early-on to bedside ultrasound will allow them to begin to develop the skills necessary to acquire relevant images, while also reinforcing physical examination techniques. Ultrasound curriculums have been implemented at several medical schools, but they all vary in structure and timing of when they are introduced. We developed an ultrasound curriculum that was imbedded in the clinical skills training that reinforced physical exam skills as well as followed the student’s gross anatomy learning.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe the increased use of ultrasound in clinical medicine
  2. Discuss ways to implement bedside ultrasound into physical diagnosis and/or clinical skills courses
  3. Identify resources necessary to implement an ultrasound curriculum in a physical diagnosis and/or clinical skills course

P08 Comparing Student Outcomes With a Novel Patients as Teachers Clinic vs the Standard Clerkship

Sara Oberhelman, MD; Robert Wilfahrt, MD

02/1/19 9:30 AM - 10:30 AM

The outpatient family medicine clerkship is an important part of medical students’ education. For the busy family medicine physician, it can be extremely challenging to meet the needs/wants of the patients, the timelines concerns of the clinic staff and still allow the student the time needed to develop his or her clinical skills. In an effort to recognize these challenges, we developed the Patients as Teachers (PAT) Clinic as part of our clerkship in 2014. The PAT Clinic assigns multiple students to a single preceptor in a clinic of acute patients where the student assumes primary responsibility to interview and examine a patient, develop and present and treatment plan and appropriately document/order. Our students spend part of their clerkship in the PAT clinic and the rest of the time with a one-on-one preceptor in that preceptor’s continuity clinic. Early data showed fantastic satisfaction from students, patients and preceptors and the PAT clinic continued as an ongoing element of our clerkship. In the spring of 2018 we had several groups of students complete our clerkship without the PAT component, allowing us to compare student outcomes for the first time. Data will be available this summer for presentation at the conference. We will compare shelf scores, preceptor evaluations/grades and student survey data (overall satisfaction, self-reported exposure to breadth of family medicine, self-reported opportunities to independently interview and examine patients).

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe the PAT (Patients as Teachers) clinic as a novel element of our third year medical student clerkship;
  2. Appreciate the outcome differences (shelf scores, evaluations, self-reported satisfaction and experience) between the students who participated in the PAT clinic versus those that did not;
  3. Think about how a similar educational initiative could be utilized at their own institutions.

P09 Just Before the Match: Recruiting Fourth-Year Medical Students to Family Medicine

Chivon Brown Stubbs; Dolapo Babalola, MD, FAAFP; Afolake Mobolaji, MD

02/1/19 9:30 AM - 10:30 AM

Family physicians are diversely skilled to practice in a wide variety of settings. Exposing students to the various practice options and skill-sets can stimulate and strengthen student interest in family medicine. This workshop is intended for both faculty and students, to learn about the unique aspects of the Morehouse School of Medicine (MSM) fourth-year family medicine subinternship and its impact on student interest in the specialty of family medicine. We will discuss components of the MSM family medicine subinternship, match outcome results as related to student enrollment in MSM subinternship, and student feedback about the clerkship. Presenters will start by discussing how the MSM family medicine subinternship was initiated. An overview of the MSM family medicine subinternship will be discussed followed by presentation of match data.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe the components of the MSM family medicine subinternship;
  2. Discuss outcomes and impact of student engagement in MSM family medicine subinternship;
  3. Describe challenges of engaging students in family medicine at MSM

P10 Aspect of the Art of Medicine: A Unique Course for Medical Honors Students (Premedical)

David Quillen, MD; Danielle Thomas, MEd; Peter Sayeski, PhD

02/1/19 9:30 AM - 10:30 AM

This session will describe the delivery and development of a two-credit course offered to third-year students in the Medical Honors Program (MHP) at the University of Florida (UF). The course is an introduction to the essential competencies needed to practice the art of medicine; it is designed to assist third-year students in the MHP for a successful transition to medical school at the UF College of Medicine. The course provides the necessary knowledge, skills, and experiences to be successful personally, professionally, and academically during their medical education and beyond. Most of the lectures for the course were developed and given to a variety of different audiences before being put together for this curriculum. Audiences included medical students of all 4 years, family medicine residents, and STFM members at several national meetings. The Medical Honors Program (MHP) is a an accelerated 7-year BS/MD program offered by the University of Florida. MHP students who successfully meet the academic and cocurricular requirements will matriculate in the UF College of Medicine.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe the development and purpose of a broad based lecture course to assist in the advancement of skill important to developing medical students, residents and practitioners.
  2. Describe the purpose of using history and historical errors to teach perspective in the practice and art of medicine.
  3. Describe the purpose of lectures on untreatable diseases and practice issues with religion in the practice of medicine.

P11 Results From an Innovative Curriculum Intervention in Family Medicine Clerkship: A Misalignment Between the Students’ Confidence and Their Knowledge and Skills in Lifestyle Medicine

Magdalena Pasarica, MD, PhD; Denise Kay, PhD

02/1/19 9:30 AM - 10:30 AM

We created an innovative outcome-based lifestyle medicine (LM) curriculum as part of the family medicine clerkship (delivered as 8 hours of instruction and assessed by a LM observed structured clinical encounter (OSCE). We surveyed 115 third-year medical students using 5-point Likert scale questions as strongly agree (5) to strongly disagree (1), or extremely confident (5) to not at all confident (1) before and after the intervention. Most students (100%, 93%, 99%) agreed that LM science, practice and education is valuable. Prior to the intervention, students were confident in prescribing LM (3.1±0.8), obtaining LM history (3.6±0.8), setting LM goals (3.0±0.9), and using motivational interviewing for LM (3.2±0.8), and the confidence increased (P<0.05). There was no change in the perceived value of LM education (P=NS). The appreciation of value of LM science decreased (P<0.05). The appreciation of value for using LM in the clinic slightly increased (P<0.05). There was no correlation between student’s confidence in and performance of LM skills (P=NS). We concluded that medical students have appreciation for the value of LM, however their confidence is rated as mostly moderate. There is a misalignment between students' perceived confidence and their skills, which may lead to either not using LM in practice or using it ineffectively. The lack of preceptor modeling the practice of LM may have influenced the student perception on the value of the LM science.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe lifestyle medicine education, its competencies and rationale for introducing it in undergraduate medical curriculum;
  2. Develop a Lifestyle medicine curriculum for integration into clinical medical curriculum;
  3. Develop assessment tools for the evaluation of lifestyle medicine curriculum.

P12 Humanism in Medicine: How a Home Visit and Written Paper Complement the Third-Year Clerkship Experience

Sarah Swofford, MD, MSPH; Mark Ellis, MD, MSPH

02/1/19 9:30 AM - 10:30 AM

In a busy third-year ambulatory clerkship, students often focus on the biomedical sciences and how to achieve benchmarks with chronic disease management. This activity asks the student to consider the entire biopsychosocial model of care, and dig deeper to learn more about one unique individual. We will present a long-standing clerkship curriculum that involves a home visit with a patient and a written paper. Students on the clerkship are asked to identify a patient with a chronic illness and interview them in their home. The student then writes a reflective writing piece that incorporates areas of the patient life they explored, as well as what lessons were learned. A rubric has been developed to assist in grading the paper and will be shared. Written papers are also a springboard for submissions to the medical school’s annual spring banquet where individual patients are recognized as key teachers for our medical students.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Consider how their clerkship teaches the biopsychosocial model of chronic disease management;
  2. Incorporate reflective writing tools in their medical student curriculum;
  3. Implement a similar patient interview and home visit into their current medical student curriculum.

P13 Relationship Between Diabetes, Physical Activity, and Rice Portion Size in the Wausau Hmong Community

Ryan Huynh; Kyle Olson

02/1/19 9:30 AM - 10:30 AM

Our session is twofold in both presenting a project and also illustrating how a new streamlined and community-based 3-year medical education has affected our schooling. We will share our experiences doing this study: there are socioeconomic and lifestyle factors that may affect the health of the local Hmong population. For example, one in five Hmong individuals in Central Wisconsin live under the poverty line, and 68% of Hmong people over 65 years of age do not speak English. These examples may have unforeseen negative outcomes on the health of the Hmong community. With an increasing Hmong population in Central Wisconsin, we wanted to learn how lifestyle differences, including diet and exercise, correlate with chronic disease rates in the Hmong community. A survey previously conducted by Dr Kevin Thao provided us with information on health insurance rates, diet, exercise rates, and chronic disease rates in the Wausau Hmong community. We focused on the relationship between physical activity, diet, and rates of diabetes. With an odds ratio analysis, we found that the local Hmong were 2.29 times more likely to develop diabetes with a sedentary lifestyle. We did not find a correlation between diet and rates of diabetes. Correlations like these can help us begin to better understand some of the factors that lead to different health outcomes in the Hmong community. By better understanding social determinants of health, we can work towards addressing health care disparities in Central Wisconsin.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Educate health care providers and Hmong patients on the appropriate recommendations for physical activity, especially in the context of this project's results;
  2. Consider health care disparities that likely exist in local minority communities while providing medical care;
  3. Educate Hmong patients on the association between sedentary behavior and diabetes prevalence as illustrated in our project.

P14 Teaching Clerkship Students to Screen for Drug and Alcohol Abuse: Screening Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT)

Marlana Li, MD; Melissa Cheng, MD, MHS; Jessica Bickley; Alzina Koric, MPP; Katherine Fortenberry, PhD

02/1/19 9:30 AM - 10:30 AM

Our family medicine clerkship incorporated screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) training into our curriculum because we felt it was important for students to understand the importance of drug and alcohol abuse screening and treatment, and also for them to learn effective motivational interviewing skills. Students completed pre- and post-SBIRT training surveys; overall we noticed an increase in their knowledge, beliefs, and confidence, showing that our intervention was effective.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Learn our method for teaching screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT);
  2. Assess the effectiveness of our method of SBIRT training;
  3. Evaluate their own clerkship curriculum to see if they can incorporate SBIRT training.

P15 Comparison of Thiel-Embalmed and LFS Models in Teaching Female Pelvic Exam Technique

Sara McHenry; Robert Becker; Kathryn Shelton; Alexandra Chatman; Arielle Schreck; Taylor Cox; Hannah Richardson; Caroline Abercrombie

02/1/19 9:30 AM - 10:30 AM

Medical students at ETSU Quillen College of Medicine currently receive pelvic exam training on low fidelity simulation (LFS) models during the first year. These models do not allow students to gain familiarity with all aspects of the pelvic exam before clinical experiences. ETSU has adopted a soft embalming technique, the Thiel method, which allows for excellent soft tissue preservation and joint mobility. This study evaluated the use of Thiel-embalmed donors compared to LFS models in teaching the pelvic exam technique. Our study exposed 32 first-year medical students to both LFS models and Thiel-embalmed donors to assess confidence and preparedness for performing pelvic examinations and transference to patient care. Participants were given a short lecture from the primary investigator and were assigned to perform pelvic examinations on both Thiel-donors and LFS models. Two groups were randomly assigned to note which teaching tool to utilize first (LFS model of Thiel-donor). Students had written instructions available during the experiment. Students completed surveys relating to confidence, preparedness, transference to patient care, and preference between the Thiel donor and LFS model for education. Our study significantly concluded that students felt more prepared and confident using the Thiel-embalmed donors and felt that this model more transferable to patient care. Overall, most students preferred to learn using LFS model and Thiel-embalmed donor together.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Identify LFS models and Thiel-embalmed donors and their roles in pelvic exam education,
  2. Discuss the study’s conclusions surrounding LFS models and Thiel-embalmed donors for teaching medical students pelvic exam technique,
  3. Discuss the implications of Thiel-embalmed donors use in medical education.

P16 Does a Socially Accountable Curriculum Transform Students Into Fit-for-Purpose Graduates?

Tyler Laurence; Amy Clithero-Eridon, PhD, MBA; Daphne Olson

02/1/19 9:30 AM - 10:30 AM

Social accountability is relatively new to medical education, but there is growing interest on its growing positive impact on people's health. Over a 2-year time period, faculty evaluated new interns who graduated from a school that has been nationally and internationally recognized as an example of social accountability excellence in medical education compared to graduates from other schools in terms of social accountability competencies. Competencies include ability and willingness to serve underserved populations, leadership, and a strong community perspective. Our findings support the value of emphasizes social accountability in medical education to better prepare graduates to meet the needs of the communities they serve.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe social accountability competencies,
  2. Define social accountability,
  3. Recognize the importance of social accountability skills in their graduates beyond biomedical knowledge and clinical skills.

P17 Improving Preceptor Narrative Feedback Comments on Student Assessments

Suzanne Minor, MD; Sarah Stumbar, MD, MPH; Marquita Samuels, BA

02/1/19 9:30 AM - 10:30 AM

Learners benefit more from narrative, specific feedback than from feedback consisting solely of numerical ratings. Our poster presents a brief pilot intervention to increase the useful, high-quality narrative feedback comments written by preceptors. Narrative comment quality can be improved through efforts to educate faculty about the nature and importance of these comments. However, these interventions are often limited by time constraints. The purpose of our pilot is to determine if an intervention requiring little additional time—adding a simple prompt to the student assessment—can improve the quality of narrative feedback comments. We will compare the specificity of responses to the prompt “Please comment on one patient encounter the student had and stands out to you (please try to be as descriptive as possible)” to the previously used prompts “Please comment on the strengths of this student’s performance” and “Please comment on areas that need improvement for this student.” We will rate the specificity of the comments on a three-point scale (specific, moderately specific, not specific). In our pilot study phase (10/2017-10/2018), this additional question was added only to our paper assessment, thereby limiting our data to preceptors who use the paper rather than electronic form. We hypothesize that the new prompt will give us narrative feedback with specific behavioral detail that is useful to the learner and clerkship director.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Discuss how adding the following prompt to clerkship evaluations impacted the narrative comments written by preceptors: “Please comment on one patient encounter the student had and stands out to you (please try to be as descriptive as possible).”
  2. Discuss the characteristics of a high quality narrative feedback comment.
  3. List one way that they may be able to revise their own assessment forms to enhance narrative feedback.


Copyright 2018 by Society of Teachers of Family Medicine