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Search Education Sessions

2017 Annual Spring Conference

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PR1 Point of Care Ultrasound for the Family Medicine Physician (DAY ONE)

Neil Jayasekera, MD; Kevin Bergman, MD; Mena Ramos, MD; Jason Reinking, MD; Erin Stratta, MD; Ian Karl Wallace, MD; Nicholas Michael LeFevre, MD; Jacqueline L Gerhart, MD

05/4/17 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM Cortez Hill ABC

Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) is rapidly establishing itself as the standard of care in many areas of medicine. Given the clear benefits of ultrasound training and the recent interest of family medicine residencies to start a POCUS curriculum and train faculty, the Contra Costa Family Medicine Ultrasound Program will offer a 2-day POCUS pre-conference workshop. The course will cover the following aspects of POCUS training, adapted for full spectrum family medicine training: cardiac, pulmonary, abdominal, renal, obstetrics, deep venous thrombosis, procedural, ocular, musculoskeletal, and soft tissue.Participants will receive a course manual, continuing medical education, and a course completion certificate that can be used to apply for ultrasound privileges at their home institution. The participant should gain enough training and resources to start or further develop a POCUS program

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Develop POCUS skills that will allow them to improve clinical outcomes, facilitate more rapid diagnoses, shorten times to definitive treatment, reduce failure and complication rates during procedures, and improve patient satisfaction.
  2. Obtain certification that may allow them to start the credentialing and privileging for POCUS at their home institution.
  3. Develop a curriculum and become a faculty mentor/teacher of POCUS in their family medicine residency.

PR1 Point of Care Ultrasound for the Family Medicine Physician (DAY TWO)

Neil Jayasekera , MD; Kevin Bergman, MD; Mena Ramos, MD; Jason Reinking, MD; Erin Stratta, MD; Ian Wallace, MD; Nicholas LeFevre, MD; Jacqueline Gerhart, MD

05/5/17 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM Cortez Hill ABC

Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) is rapidly establishing itself as the standard of care in many areas of medicine. Given the clear benefits of ultrasound training and the recent interest of family medicine residencies to start a POCUS curriculum and train faculty, the Contra Costa Family Medicine Ultrasound Program will offer a 2-day POCUS pre-conference workshop. The course will cover the following aspects of POCUS training, adapted for full spectrum family medicine training: cardiac, pulmonary, abdominal, renal, obstetrics, deep venous thrombosis, procedural, ocular, musculoskeletal, and soft tissue.Participants will receive a course manual, continuing medical education, and a course completion certificate that can be used to apply for ultrasound privileges at their home institution. The participant should gain enough training and resources to start or further develop a POCUS program

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Develop POCUS skills that will allow them to improve clinical outcomes, facilitate more rapid diagnoses, shorten times to definitive treatment, reduce failure and complication rates during procedures, and improve patient satisfaction.
  2. Obtain certification that may allow them to start the credentialing and privileging for POCUS at their home institution.
  3. Develop a curriculum and become a faculty mentor/teacher of POCUS in their family medicine residency.

PR2 Teaching About Racial Justice: A Train the Trainer Faculty Development Workshop

Jennifer Edgoose, MD, MPH; Andrea Anderson, MD; Joedrecka Brown Speights, MD; Katura Bullock, PharmD; Warren Ferguson, MD; Jessica Guh, MD; Adrienne Hampton; David Henderson, MD; Robin Lankton, MPH, CHES; Kortnee Roberson, MD; Denise Rodgers, MD; George Saba, PhD; Tanya White-Davis, PsyD

05/5/17 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM Coronado B

“The man with the gun was twelve-year old Tamir Rice playing in the park” - Dr David Henderson. Health disparities persist but are not inevitable. To move towards equity, Dr Camara Jones implored us to address racism in her 2016 Society of Teachers of Family Medicine general session. Current teaching of disparity statistics and cultural competence training are inadequate as a means to effect change. They often contribute to misconceptions of race as a biologic construct; ignore the contribution of clinician implicit bias; and exacerbate stereotype threat amongst underrepresented minority (URM) learners. At last year’s conference our national interdisciplinary and multi-racial group led a workshop called "Teaching About Racism in the Context of Persistent Health and Healthcare Disparities." We shared a toolkit housing resources to facilitate further teaching and learning around issues of racism, implicit bias, privilege and the intersectionality of identities. In this faculty development preconference, participants will acquire skills enabling them to teach learners to not only reflect upon their own biases but also to support learners who are "recipients" of microaggressions. Attendees will be invited to participate in a study evaluating this curriculum.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Define implicit bias, privilege, intersectionality and microaggression in the setting of health care.
  2. Gain skills and confidence in facilitating difficult conversations about racism through structured activities.
  3. Apply individualized strategies to implement curricular changes around racial justice to their own departments, residencies, and clinical environments.

PR3 Integrating Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine Into the Family Medicine Residency: An Introduction

Jon Schultz, MD; Eleni O'Donovan, MD; Diana Heiman, MD; Paula Mackrides, DO; Christina Raguckas, DO; Kenneth Bielak, MD; Ali Abdallah, DO; Mary Boyce, MD; Parul Chaudhri, DO; Sarah Cole, DO, FAAFP; Keith Egan, DO; Justin Jenkins, DO, MBA; Lawrence LeBeau, DO; Michael Petrizzi, MD

05/5/17 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM Coronado D

This pre-conference workshop is designed to provide a foundation in osteopathic principles and practice and basic skills in osteopathic diagnosis and manipulative treatment for medical students, residents and family medicine faculty with little to no training in osteopathic medicine. It is also an excellent opportunity for doctors of osteopathic medicine (DOs) to refresh their skills.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Understand the four tenets of osteopathic medicine and their applicability to allopathic as well as osteopathic medicine.
  2. Demonstrate the basic osteopathic assessment and treatment of 3–4 common diagnoses that present in outpatient and inpatient family medicine settings.
  3. Produce an outline of a training curriculum in osteopathic assessment and treatment for non-DOs within his/her own program using the tools provided by the workshop.

PR4 Leadership Development for New Faculty in Family Medicine: Learn New Skills in Mentorship, Scholarly Activity, Research Development, Advocacy, Wellness, and Resilience

Michelle Roett, MD, MPH, FAAFP, CPE; Rahmat Na'Allah, MD, MPH; Elise Morris, MD; Angela Kuznia, MD, MPH; Tyler Barreto, MD; Julie Petersen; Cheryl K. Seymour, MD

05/5/17 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM Coronado A

New faculty face unique challenges navigating the multifaceted domains of medical student education, residency training, and research. Family medicine departments often struggle to provide a comprehensive orientation for new faculty or a sustainable model for continuous faculty development. Presenters will provide a toolkit for new faculty, providing guidance on faculty development, mentorship, coaching, giving effective feedback, scholarly activity, research development, advocacy, and faculty and resident wellness. Presenters will facilitate discussions on common challenges and fundamental resources including an updated toolkit incorporating feedback from annual sessions presented 2011–2016. A faculty panel will present leadership development activities, mentorship and coaching styles for seeking adequate support, take questions and offer advice including guidance on seeking and giving feedback, establishing an advocacy learning plan and agenda, research development, and creating an educator portfolio. A balanced approach to faculty life is becoming increasingly important with the increased administrative burden and limited wellness resources. Presenters will review wellness activities and modeling work-life balance.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe the most common personal, clinical, administrative, and academic challenges identified by new faculty in family medicine and identify resources for overcoming barriers.
  2. Identify effective mentoring and coaching concepts and styles, identify accessible opportunities for building mentoring and coaching relationships, and describe strategies for maintaining and modeling work-life balance.
  3. Implement faculty development programs, by learning about family medicine advocacy, faculty roles in supporting medical student interest in family medicine, and developing a pipeline of students and residents as new family medicine faculty.

PR5 Family Medicine Departments Collaborating to Impact Student Choice

Ashley Bentley, MBA; Jay Fetter Jr, MSA; Wanda Gonsalves, MD; Christina Kelly, MD; Michelle Roett, MD, MPH, FAAFP, CPE

05/5/17 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM Coronado E

Faculty and staff in departments of family medicine across the country work to implement programs and practices that best represent the specialty of family medicine and encourage student exploration and choice of family medicine careers. This workshop will bring together ideas that can be further developed and/or replicated at other institutions. This workshop is an extension of two efforts: The Family Medicine for America's Health Playbook and the Student Choice Learning Community. Those efforts together the community of family medicine department chairs, vice chairs, and medical student education directors to work together to impact student choice. This workshop will allow participants to exchange their own best practices, as well as to further develop those best practices. The workshop will provide direction and space for developing and improving measurement and metrics associated with student choice initiatives, and how to build support and value for that work at a medical school. Participants will also work on their own overarching plan to address student choice.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Identify programs, practices, and other initiatives that result in positive deviance in student choice of family medicine.
  2. Develop and strengthen existing programs and practices that positively impact student choice to make them more effective, to establish relevant metrics, and to measure and continuously improve on those practices.
  3. Develop a departmental work plan for improving accountability of the participant’s own medical school to increase the family medicine workforce.

PR6 Learning to Teach and Teaching to Learn: Dynamic Approaches to Improve Teaching Skills Aimed at Your Own Personal Faculty Development and Career Advancement

Kathryn Fraser, PhD; Jeffrey Morzinski, PhD, MSW; Hayam Shaker, MD; Colleen Fogarty, MD, MSc; Corey Smith, PsyD; Brenda Wilson, MS LT

05/5/17 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM Coronado B

As medical educators, we are tasked with teaching complex subjects to a wide variety of learners. Many of us were trained as clinicians, not as teachers, and therefore need to acquire teaching skills through focused learning. This session is about theory-based teaching activities designed to produce meaningful change in learners. Participants will experience how this group fosters "whole person" teaching, with experiential learning, inspiring feedback, and effective body language and gestures to convey the educational message. The preconference will: (1) focus on evidence based teaching and learning theories, (2) provide opportunities for participants to practice a variety of teaching techniques based on such theories, and (3) provide tools to help them set short term and long-term teaching and career development goals. Participants will complete a pre-test and a post-test to monitor their learning. At the end of the preconference, they will designate colleagues with whom to discuss their learning goals so they can continue their learning experience. The ultimate goals are for attendees to acquire skills and teaching techniques that promote a commitment to their own faculty development and career paths as teachers.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe teaching theories that apply to didactic and clinical settings.
  2. Practice applications of teaching methods that take into account learning style, group dynamics, body language, and principles of effective feedback.
  3. Self-assess one’s own gaps and strengths as an educator and begin to form a plan for continuous learning and career development as a professional family medicine educator.

PR7 Finding Resiliency, Compassion, and Hope Through Reflective Writing, Storytelling, and Story Listening

Lucille Marchand, MD, BSN; Colleen Fogarty, MD, MSc; Paul Gross, MD; Jonathan Han, MD; Jo Marie Reilly, MD; Johanna Shapiro, PhD

05/5/17 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM Regatta B

Resiliency, compassion, and hope in clinicians depend on connection to our deepest values and calling to do the work we do. In the grind of our day-to-day work lives, we can lose that thread of calling and meaning in our work. It is then easier to become burned out, emotionally fatigued, and hopeless. Our salaries and working conditions are important, but our inner life is what empowers us to change the external factors that can potentially crush our spirit. Our resiliency depends on practices such as writing and story telling that nurture our wholeness and discernment of work conditions that are not in keeping with our values, and that help us see our patients as unique people deserving of our compassion rather than our exhaustion.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Identify our innate qualities that foster well-being and connect us to our deepest self, our calling, our values, and our heart.
  2. Experience four writing methods that can be incorporated into personal reflection, professional care, and teaching.
  3. Integrate self-reflective writing, story telling, and story listening into a contemplative personal practice and into the teaching of learners to nurture resiliency, compassion, and hope, and minimize burnout and compassion fatigue.

W18 STFM Poetry and Prose Session 2017

Lucille Marchand, MD, BSN; Andrea Gordon, MD; Hugh Silk, MPH, MD

05/5/17 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM Mission Beach ABC

Poetry and creative prose allow for the expression of humanistic concerns about both doctor-patient and teacher-learner relationships, facilitating emotional reflection on the themes of illness and death, birth, growth, teaching, learning, and family. Reading poems and stories to our peers promotes professional bonding as we share the struggles, joys, and sorrows encountered in the practice of medicine and mentoring new physicians. Participants are invited to bring their works (up to five minutes in length) and read them to the group. Participants are also encouraged to share their work through publication, and the group provides encouragement, advice, and resources to make this possible.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Identify other Society of Teachers of Family Medicine (STFM) members whose struggles and insights into the practice of medicine are similar to their own.
  2. Recognize other members of STFM who are active in the medical humanities.
  3. Improve their writing based on supportive peer feedback.

B002 Major Career Transitions: Preparation and Execution of a Change in Your Leadership Role

Scott Fields, MD, MHA; Megan McGhean, MS; John Saultz, MD

05/6/17 7:15 AM - 8:15 AM Harbor Ballroom

A career in academic medicine frequently includes opportunities for transition in your leadership role. This new role may include more, or less, responsibility and accountability. How will you know if this transition is good for you, both personally and professionally? How will you know if you are prepared for this transition? How will you execute this transition? This session will help you prepare for a major career transition by addressing seven key questions you will need to answer prior to taking action.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Articulate the attributes that they value within their current role, and the aspirations that they have for their future role.
  2. Describe what they need to learn in order to obtain both personal satisfaction and professional success in their new role.
  3. Identify the right people to mentor them in this new role.

B004 Human Trafficking: Family Medicine Can Lead the Care of This Vulnerable Patient Population

Ronald Chambers Jr, MD; Holly Gibbs

05/6/17 7:15 AM - 8:15 AM Harbor Ballroom

Human trafficking has gained increasing public awareness in recent years. Nearly all family physicians encounter this population, unfortunately most lack the education and training to provide appropriate care. They are under-informed about the enormous scope of the problem and inadequately understand the challenges they will face when treating a victim of human trafficking. This workshop will review the definitions and legal issues of human trafficking, provide screening recommendations, review common physical and psychiatric comorbidities associated with the trauma these patients have endured, review victim/trauma-centered care, provide initial intervention techniques, and review the longitudinal multidisciplinary approach needed to assist victims throughout their recovery. Family physicians are able to serve these patients in a comprehensive manner not found in other specialties. The field is unique both in scope and longitudinal timeframe making family medicine best suited to take the lead and truly care for this vulnerable patient population. Incorporated into the presentation will be a structured curriculum for human trafficking education and guidelines on incorporation of this training into family medicine residency programs.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Understand the scope of human trafficking nationally and identify where it occurrs within their own communities.
  2. Recognize their patient is a human trafficking victim and know how to access appropriate resources and provide victim-centered, trauma-informed care.
  3. Incorporate the supplied human trafficking curriculum, education and training into their own residency programs.

B005 Residents Leading the Way: Teaching Residents to Run a Diabetic Group Visit

RoseAnne Illes, PhD; Carl Nyberg; Olevia Metry; Julia Fashner, MD, MPH

05/6/17 7:15 AM - 8:15 AM Harbor Ballroom

Combating chronic disease, such as diabetes is a challenge with brief individual appointments. New models such as group medical visits have been employed at increased rates to combat diabetes and other chronic disease, and address the challenges faced with standard medical appointments. This presentation will describe what faculty members need from their residents to implement/perform these visits, and specific skills necessary to teach residents prior to running a group, such as group theory, behavior change theory, and facilitation skills. The skills necessary for facilitating group visits is similar to running family meetings, committee meetings, or other leadership roles.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe three theories that aid in group facilitation.
  2. Identify challenges to teaching residents group facilitation skills.
  3. Discuss benefits to residents learning how to run a group medical visit.

B006 Introducing the Concepts of Lifestyle Medicine Competencies in Residency

Ruben Hernandez Mondragon, MD

05/6/17 7:15 AM - 8:15 AM Harbor Ballroom

During the round table discussion we will describe the lifestyle medicine competencies for primary care created by the American College of Preventive Medicine including: leadership, knowledge, assessment skills, management skills and use of office and community support and how it has been introduced in our longitudinal residency curriculum with a series of workshops focused on nutrition, fitness, and wellness in collaboration with fitness instructors, certified nutritionists, and behavioral science providers. The round table session will create an environment to stimulate conversation of all participants on different ways to introduce these concepts into residency training.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe the lifestyle medicine competencies for primary care physicians.
  2. Create program initiatives on how to introduce the concepts of lifestyle modification into the residency curriculum as well as potential collaborators.
  3. Discuss evaluation tools applicable to healthy lifestyle training.

B007 Building a Faculty Development Track for Residents: A Pipeline for Future Family Medicine Educators

Ann Rutter, MD, MS; Nora Callinan; Jennifer Lee, MD; Angela Antonikowski, PhD

05/6/17 7:15 AM - 8:15 AM Harbor Ballroom

Robust research indicates that there is a shortage of primary care physicians (PCPs) in the United States, which is estimated to grow to a shortage of 52,000 PCPs by the year 2025. One of the consequences of this shortage will be a paucity of physicians available for training future PCPs. The development of clinically-relevant training pipelines is necessary to fill this gap. One method is to create clinical training tracks within residency programs that facilitate the development of family medicine physicians skilled to train and work in academic medical settings. We have developed a longitudinal curriculum where self-identified residents can participate and learn the skills necessary to become the teachers for the next generation of PCPs. The curriculum includes elements to address all facets of future faculty members including teaching skills, curriculum development, and scholarship. There is also a component that addresses personal professional development, with a focus on work-life balance and mentorship. The goal of this round table discussion will be to share our early experiences with development and implementation of such a program and to learn from others who are pursuing similar projects.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe the logistics of our residency program’s approach to addressing the inevitable shortage of primary care clinician-educators through implementation of a Faculty Development track.
  2. Explain the rationale for the specific components within our faculty development track designed to provide residents with multifaceted skills related to teaching, curriculum development, scholarship and professional development, and mentorship.
  3. Discuss ideas and best practices from other participants in addition to the main presenters so that all may consider implementation of this type of curriculum at their home programs.

B008 Don't Slow my Flow: How to Teach Well in the Outpatient Setting Without Falling Behind

Monica Demasi, MD; Bharat Gopal, MD, MPH

05/6/17 7:15 AM - 8:15 AM Harbor Ballroom

The purpose of this session is to provide outpatient teaching physicians with the necessary skillset to teach well in the ambulatory setting without falling behind. This session will provide tips and strategies for high quality yet efficient teaching garnered from the speakers combined 23 years’ experience in medical education and from an extensive literature review. The majority of the session time will be spent brainstorming obstacles and solutions and working in small groups to role model best practices and make action plans to improve participants’ teaching efficiency.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Identify their biggest obstacles for efficient ambulatory teaching of medical students and brainstorm at least two potential solutions.
  2. List five activities that medical students can do that both contribute to their education and improve preceptor efficiency.
  3. Synthesize and reinforce skills learned by working on role play to use with patients and medical learners.

B009 Asynchronous Learning: How to Supplement Live Teaching With Brief Online Training Modules

Matthew Martin, PhD

05/6/17 7:15 AM - 8:15 AM Harbor Ballroom

Cognitive science research indicates that students learn best from presentations that are interesting, concise, and visually-stimulating. Students also learn best when material is presented repeatedly, but in different forms. Recent developments in online learning afford educators the software necessary to produce such presentations and supplement live learning (lecture) with asynchronous learning (online module). The purpose of this session is to introduce two software programs (Camtasia and Adobe Captivate) that educators can utilize to supplement their curriculum. I will describe the utility of these programs, demonstrate examples for behavioral medicine curriculum, and explain how to use this software to prepare students for live lecture presentations.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Explain the value and importance of developing effective presentations.
  2. Describe Camtasia and Adobe Captivate software programs.
  3. Understand how to supplement live learning with asynchronous learning.

B010 First Do no Harm: Optimizing Quality and Safety Training

Lance Fuchs, MD; Vidush Athyal, MD, MPH, FAAFP

05/6/17 7:15 AM - 8:15 AM Harbor Ballroom

The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requires family medicine residency programs to train residents in quality improvement, safety and scholarly activity. Each program has implemented unique strategies to achieve these educational goals. This session highlights our community-based residency’s longitudinal integrated approach to quality, safety and performance improvement training for family medicine residents. Participants should be able to implement strategies to improve their own quality improvement curriculum, panel management activities and safety training in the patient centered medical home model after attending this presentation.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Understand important components of a quality, safety and performance improvement curriculum.
  2. Understand strategies to integrate quality and safety training into their residency curriculum.
  3. Understand strategies to implement panel management activities into their residency curriculum.

B011 Transitioning from an Individual Quality Improvement Project Format to a Departmental Quality Improvement Project in an Academic Family Medicine Clinic

Richard Lord Jr, MD, MA; Emily Mann, MD; Holly Borders; Kaitlyn Watson, MD

05/6/17 7:15 AM - 8:15 AM Harbor Ballroom

Academic family medicine is a growing field with an increasing focus on quality improvement (QI) and care measures. At our academic family medicine clinic at Wake Forest Baptist Health, we sought to transition from an individual-based QI project to a departmental QI project in order to focus on population health, team-based research, and in order to implement a larger-scale project with the potential for practice change. We thus designed our QI project around increasing Prevnar, Pneumovax, and Zostavax vaccination rates in the elderly (60+ years) Wake Forest Family Medicine clinic population. We introduced a patient questionnaire that served as a provider prompt, and each provider was required to analyze his or her own pre- and post-intervention data. Overall, clinic vaccination rates in our predefined elderly population increased. Our providers used this project as a self-directed American Board of Family Medicine (ABFM) part IV requirement; in fact, the third-year residents were required to submit their data to the ABFM, and all were approved for part IV credit. This new departmental QI project format will carry forward on a 1–2 year cycle. Residents will be expected to submit their individual data to satisfy the ABFM part IV requirement for graduation.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe the benefits of a departmental vs individual QI project.
  2. Describe how to transition from an individual-based QI project to a departmental QI project in an academic family medicine clinic, and how to submit the project for ABFM part IV credit.
  3. Describe common barriers to a departmental QI project and how to troubleshoot them.

B012 Tales From the Clinic: Behavioral Health Providers' First Year of Integrating Behavioral Health Into Family Medicine

Holly Hallman; Katie Hyland; Linda Perkins McRae, LCSW, PsyD

05/6/17 7:15 AM - 8:15 AM Harbor Ballroom

Behavioral health has historically been treated as a category all its own, with services typically provided in a setting completely separate from a patient-centered medical home (PCMH) and with very limited opportunity for collaboration between medical and behavioral health providers. Enter integrated care, in which medical and behavioral health providers work together in a primary care setting to support the overall health of the patient, recognizing that what happens in the body affects the mind and vice versa. The presenters will discuss their experience of integrating behavioral health into a family medicine residency in an academic setting and federally qualified health center. The success of integration includes interdisciplinary training, clinical and operational modifications, knowledge of behavioral health interventions, and avoiding pitfalls to successful integration.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Identify a variety of patient conditions appropriate for integrated care interventions.
  2. Apply behavioral health strategies to intervene in common patient presentations.
  3. Describe the challenges and benefits of integration.

B013 Advancing in a Retreat: Lessons Learned From an Annual Regional Residency Collaboration Day

Tina Kenyon, MSW; Amy Trelease-Bell, MD; Deborah Taylor, PhD; Julie Schirmer, LCSW, MSW

05/6/17 7:15 AM - 8:15 AM Harbor Ballroom

Representatives from family medicine residencies in Maine, New Hampshire and Vermont gather annually for a day of collaborative conversation and support. A planning committee with representatives from each program solicits topics from their program faculty, and prioritizes them based on interest. The day includes interactive educational sessions and facilitated conversations, along with updates from each program. This session will describe the logistics, variety of topics, and observations from the annual retreats, and participants will be invited to share their own experience with regional residency gatherings.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Identify the advantages of connecting with other programs in one’s geographic region.
  2. Describe logistics of convening a regional retreat.
  3. Generate ideas for exploring a regional gathering in their home regions.


Copyright 2017 by Society of Teachers of Family Medicine