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49th STFM Annual Spring Conference

2016 Annual Spring Conference

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PR01 Point of Care Ultrasound for the Family Medicine Physician (DAY ONE)

Neil Jayasekera, MD; Kevin Bergman, MD; Amy Buoncristiani, MD; Matthew Fentress; Stuart Forman, MD

04/29/16 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM Conrad B

Point-of-care ultrasound is rapidly establishing itself as the standard of care in many areas of medicine. Given the clear benefits of ultrasound training and the recent interest of family medicine residencies to start a POCUS curriculum and train faculty, the Contra Costa Family Medicine Ultrasound Program and STFM will offer a 2-day POCUS pre-conference workshop prior to the main conference in April. The basis for any credentialing process to receive POCUS privileges is to take a 2-day POCUS course. The Contra Costa FMR would provide the same course that they have given to Family Medicine residents and attendings the past 5 years. This course covers the following aspects of POCUS training, adapted for full-spectrum Family Medicine training: Cardiac; Lung; Abdominal; Renal; OB; Deep Venous Thrombosis; Procedural; Ocular; Musculoskeltal; Soft Tissue. All participants receive a course manual, CME and a course completion certificate that would allow them to apply for ultrasound privileges at their home institution. It is our hope that the participant would gain enough training and resources in the course to start or further develop a POCUS program at their home institution.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Develop POCUS skills that will allow them to improve clinical outcomes, facilitate more rapid diagnoses, shorten times to definitive treatment, reduces failure and complication rates during procedures, and improves patient satisfaction.
  2. Achieve certification that will allow them to apply for credentialing and privileging in the use of POCUS at their home institution.
  3. Develop a curriculum and become a faculty mentor/ teacher of POCUS in their family medicine residency.

PR06 Faculty For Tomorrow Workshop For Residents

Stoney A. Abercrombie, MD, FAAFP; Paul Gordon, MD, MPH; Sharon K. Hull, MD, MPH; Kelly Jones, MD; Stanley M. Kozakowski, MD; Jeffrey Brian Lanier, MD; Paul R. Larson, MD, MS, DTMH; Steven Lin, MD; Cathleen E. Morrow, MD; Dawn Pruett; Meaghan Ruddy, MA, PhD; Sonya Shipley, MD

04/30/16 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM Marquette Ballroom 9

This workshop, created by the STFM Faculty for Tomorrow Task Force and sponsored by the STFM Foundation, is for residents and fellows who are interested in careers in academic family medicine. The workshop will include stories of inspiration from family medicine leaders across the country, a guided self-assessment and reflection, breakout sessions with four different learning stations, a mentoring luncheon, two keynote speakers, a career planning panel, and a popular speed mentoring session with some of the most respected faculty in family medicine Participants will gain the knowledge and skills needed to succeed and thrive as new faculty.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe the personal and professional rewards, as well as the major challenges that come with being faculty in family medicine (Attitudes).
  2. List the top 10 pearls of clinical teaching and describe practical strategies for success in academia (Knowledge).
  3. Give effective feedback to learners and write a winning curriculum vitae for a faculty position (Skills).

PR01 Point of Care Ultrasound for the Family Medicine Physician (DAY TWO)

Neil Jayasekera MD, MD; Kevin Bergman MD, MD

04/30/16 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM Conrad B

Point-of-care ultrasound is rapidly establishing itself as the standard of care in many areas of medicine. Given the clear benefits of ultrasound training and the recent interest of family medicine residencies to start a POCUS curriculum and train faculty, the Contra Costa Family Medicine Ultrasound Program and STFM will offer a 2-day POCUS pre-conference workshop prior to the main conference in April. The basis for any credentialing process to receive POCUS privileges is to take a 2-day POCUS course. The Contra Costa FMR would provide the same course that they have given to Family Medicine residents and attendings the past 5 years. This course covers the following aspects of POCUS training, adapted for full-spectrum Family Medicine training: Cardiac; Lung; Abdominal; Renal; OB; Deep Venous Thrombosis; Procedural; Ocular; Musculoskeltal; Soft Tissue. All participants receive a course manual, CME and a course completion certificate that would allow them to apply for ultrasound privileges at their home institution. It is our hope that the participant would gain enough training and resources in the course to start or further develop a POCUS program at their home institution.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Develop POCUS skills that will allow them to improve clinical outcomes, facilitate more rapid diagnoses, shorten times to definitive treatment, reduces failure and complication rates during procedures, and improves patient satisfaction.
  2. Achieve certification that will allow them to apply for credentialing and privileging in the use of POCUS at their home institution.
  3. Develop a curriculum and become a faculty mentor/ teacher of POCUS in their family medicine residency.

PR02 Quality Mentorship Through STFM

Joedrecka Brown Speights, MD; Kenneth Brummel-Smith, MD; Edgar Figueroa, MD, MPH; Evelyn Figueroa, MD; Judy Washington, MD

04/30/16 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM Marquette Ballroom 7

The Groups on Minority and Multicultural Health and Latino Faculty received an STFM Foundation grant to develop a faculty mentorship infrastructure for STFM. The long-term goals of this project are to (1) enhance mentorship opportunities of excellence for STFM members, (2) improve resiliency and retention of underrepresented in medicine minority family medicine faculty, and (3) increase educational and leadership diversity for the Society. The project will initially focus on underrepresented in medicine minority (URM) faculty and then expand to involve Emerging Leaders and participants in the Medical Education and Annual Spring Conferences. This workshop will bring together mentor-mentee pairs for the first time as required by the approved grant proposal. It will highlight the benefits of mentorship for the mentor-mentee, discuss resiliency and share tools, equip participants with mentorship success tips, and explore important issues of mentorship diversity, communication, and the unique needs of URM faculty. This session will focus on providing attendees with tools for successful mentorship. It aligns with the Triple Aim in that it will lead to better quality, health, and value for our teachers and the communities we serve.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe the benefits of mentorship for the mentor-mentee and nurture their learning through discussion with peers and mentors.
  2. Explain issues of mentorship diversity, communication, and the unique needs of URM faculty.
  3. Discuss resiliency and practice at least one tool for stress management (eg, HeartMath).

PR03 Optimizing Interdisciplinary Maternity Care in FM Residencies: Expanding Your Teaching Toolkit

Jessica Goldstein, MD; Sara Shields, MD, MS; Wetona Suzanne Eidson-Ton, MD, MS; Martha Carlough, MD, MPH; Daniel Frayne, MD; Paul Koch, MD, MS; Richard Long, MD; Lee Dresang, MD; Narges Farahi, MD; Camille Garrison, MD; Jennifer Pfau, MD; Karen Lupa; Siobhan Wulff; Lucy M. Candib, MD; Navid Roder, MD; Jordana Weil Price, MD; Stephanie T. Carter-Henry, MD, MS; Cynthia K Anderson MD, MPH, FACOG; Michelle Sia; Emily Beaman CNM

04/30/16 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM Marquette Ballroom 5

The role of family medicine in addressing national unmet maternity needs remains critical especially around access to care and promotion of low-tech, woman-centered care. Reducing health disparities in perinatal outcomes and unnecessary birth interventions requires family medicine maternity training to incorporate not only operative procedural skills but also low-tech approaches using innovative, multidisciplinary programs. Residencies with their unique needs can nonetheless tailor and share common themes about these methods of training to meet such new millennium needs. This interactive pre-conference will showcase best practices in innovative family medicine maternity care curricula. We will emphasize collaborating across disciplines to address maternity care challenges such as skyrocketing intervention rates, persistent health disparities, and maintaining competency and engagement with maternity care among family medicine residents and faculty. We will focus on strategies that address education and training about the Triple Aim of improving quality, improving safety, and reducing cost in maternity care. We will emphasize small-group discussions and sharing tools for participants to bring to their own residencies.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Integrate concepts of low-tech, high touch preconception, prenatal, intrapartum, and postpartum care into the participant’s residency’s maternity curriculum.
  2. Summarize strategies for working with other disciplines (pediatricians and obstetricians, nurses, midwives, public health professionals) to incorporate evidence-based maternity practices into family medicine training.
  3. Share toolkit for curriculum development to apply to own residency, focusing on best practices to address health care disparities in maternity care, including prenatal care, interconception care, breast-feeding promotion, and labor support, in residency training.

PR04 Learning Faculty Development Skills: A Toolkit for New Faculty in Family Medicine

Michelle Roett, MD, MPH; Rahmat Na'Allah, MD, MPH, FAAFP; Elise B Morris, MD; Angela Kuznia, MD, MPH; Cheryl Seymour, MD

04/30/16 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM Marquette Ballroom 6

New faculty face unique challenges navigating medical student and residency education. Family medicine departments often struggle to provide a comprehensive orientation for new faculty or a sustainable model for continuing faculty development. Presenters will provide a toolkit for new faculty, providing guidance on faculty development, mentorship, coaching, giving effective feedback, scholarly activity, and faculty and resident wellness. Presenters will facilitate discussions on common challenges and fundamental resources including an updated toolkit incorporating feedback from annual sessions presented 2011-2015. A faculty panel will present mentorship and coaching styles for seeking adequate support, take questions and offer advice, including guidance on seeking and giving feedback and establishing an educator portfolio. A balanced approach to faculty life is becoming increasingly important with the increased administrative burden and limited wellness resources. Presenters will review wellness activities and modeling work-life balance. Identifying coaching styles and mentorship opportunities is a crucial component of faculty development, particularly with pressing need for collaborative work and scholarly activity products.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe the most common personal, clinical, administrative, and academic challenges identified by new faculty in family medicine, identify challenges to maintaining work-life balance, and identify resources for overcoming barriers.
  2. Identify effective mentoring and coaching concepts and styles, identify opportunities for building mentoring and coaching relationships, describe effective feedback, and describe strategies for maintaining and modeling work-life balance.
  3. Be introduced to tools to implement faculty development programs and identify existing local, regional, and national resources to support faculty development for new faculty in family medicine.

PR05 Becoming a Model Educator: Developing Your Plan for Personal Faculty Development and Inspirational Teaching

Julie Schirmer, LCSW, MSW; Wanda Gonsalves, MD; Kathryn Fraser, PhD; Julie Nyquist, PhD; Deborah Erlich, MD, MMedEd; Jeffrey Morzinski, PhD, MSW

04/30/16 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM Marquette Ballroom 3

A personal plan of lifelong learning is required of teachers of family medicine. The Milestones project has made it essential for faculty to grow their teaching skills and be more specific and intentional in their approach to teaching. The ACGME requires programs to have a faculty development program in place, yet programs vary in their levels of guidance, support, and resources in this area. This workshop, presented by leaders from the STFM Behavioral Science Family System Educator Fellowship and the Group on Faculty Development, will describe essential theory, knowledge, and skills for faculty to enhance their clinical and didactic teaching on their road to becoming master educators and scholars. Participants will also hear about the larger picture of the ACGME’s faculty development requirements, which includes a focus on administrative, professionalism, and leadership skills. Specific assessments as well as learning activities will be included to help each individual to identify their personal strengths and growing edges as teachers. Participants will be encouraged to take this information back to their programs, to identify their faculty’s needs and potential plans for their system’s own faculty development program.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe learning principles that underlie excellent clinical and classroom teaching.
  2. Self-assess and identify one’s own gaps and strengths as an educator and develop a map that charts their journey to becoming master teachers.
  3. Begin to formulate their own ideas for bringing faculty development to their program faculty or enhancing faculty development programs already in place.

W13 STFM Poetry and Prose Reading

Lucille Marchand, MD, BSN; Hugh Silk, MPH, MD; Andrea Gordon, MD

04/30/16 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Poetry and creative prose allow for the expression of humanistic concerns about both doctor-patient and teacher-learner relationships, facilitating emotional reflection on the themes of illness and death, birth, growth, teaching, learning, and family. Reading poems and stories to our peers promotes professional bonding as we share the struggles, joys, and sorrows encountered in the practice of medicine and mentoring new physicians. Participants are invited to bring their works (up to 5 minutes in length) and read them to the group. Participants are also encouraged to share their work through publication, and the group provides encouragement, advice, and resources to make this possible.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Identify other STFM members whose struggles and insights into the practice of medicine are similar to their own.
  2. Recognize other members of STFM who are active in the medical humanities.
  3. Be able to improve their writing based on supportive peer feedback
  4. Identify appropriate forums for publishing high-quality medical poems and essays.

B001 Family Medicine Under Fire: How to Strengthen our Residency Programs

Heather Paladine, MD; Montgomery Douglas, MD; Barbara Keber, MD; Anita Softness, MD

05/1/16 7:15 AM - 8:15 AM Grand Ballroom

In October 2015, the NY Presbyterian/Columbia Family Medicine faculty and residents were notified of a hospital decision to close the program. This announcement was followed by an outpouring of support from medical students, individuals and organizations within Family Medicine, and outside advocates. Although the hospital announced the following day that the residency program would continue to operate, this incident points out the vulnerability of many programs and our need to proactively strengthen them. This session will discuss the data regarding why programs are threatened, and how faculty can work to strengthen ties with their sponsoring hospitals, medical schools, and the community. We will also discuss lessons learned that may be different from what has been noted previously; the importance of Twitter and other social media, the strength of the medical student response, and the national conversation about Family Medicine and primary care all had an impact. Finally, we will engage the attendees in a discussion of how residency faculty can and must use social media and proactive discussions with sponsoring hospitals and affiliated medical schools to strengthen their programs and more effectively communicate these strengths.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. 1. Apply lessons learned from one example of a recent residency program closure and reopening to possible weaknesses in their home programs.
  2. 2. Recognize possible supporters such as medical students, community groups, and local politicians.

B002 How Patients Identify God in Urgent and Emergent Situations

Gregory A Doyle, MD; Steven Stefancic

05/1/16 7:15 AM - 8:15 AM Grand Ballroom

The West Virginia University School of Medicine Rural Track specifically trains students to be expert providers with a focus in rural medicine. Rural Communities have a smaller population of patients when compared to large urban research studies, therefore research conducted in these settings can be more impactful to the culture than urban publications. This study assesses the religiosity of rural urgent and emergent situations. A better understanding of how patients view their spirituality assessed in times of crisis will provide insight of making patients more comfortable. Patients over 18 years of age within a Level 1 Trauma Center serving rural communities will be asked to participate in this study. Once enrolled, individuals will respond to a series of demographic and religious spiritual questions to gain the content of their religious views; each person's view will be assessed to detect how their beliefs influence life decisions.Rural America is widely known for a conservative nature, and as such, should be approached differently than urban areas in both research and spiritual assessment. This study provides needed information to ease patient stress and approach, during routine appointments and near fatal situations.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. On completion of this session, the participants should be able to get a background of the culturally senstive topic of religion and medical decison making.
  2. Review the questionare data and discuss potential implications.

B003 Reinvention or Being Carried Out in a Box: Non-Financial Aspects of Physician Retirement

James Greenwald, MD; Steven Vincent, MD; Carrie Roseamelia, PhD

05/1/16 7:15 AM - 8:15 AM Grand Ballroom

Most physicians have worked with financial planners and will have a secure income at age 65 whether they work or not. We will have the freedom to keep working at the same pace, reduce our work hours, change our work activities, or stop working altogether. It is not surprising that over half of physicians continue to work in some capacity. Some stay too long, and lose the ability to practice due to cognitive decline or lack of continuing education. Research shows that emotional preparation for retirement improves satisfaction, but there is little research into what steps make this most effective. We will review research and some popular treatises on retirement briefly then have an interactive discussion with the participants to advance the work of describing the important parameters of this work. Our target audience is physicians over 50 who are either starting emotional preparation or those researchers interested in studying this.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Have a better appreciation of the work of physicians over the age of 65.
  2. Improve their ability to describe components of emotional preparation for physician retirement.
  3. Explore opportunities to advance research about physician retirement.

B004 Teaching Wellness, It’s Not the Absence of Illness: Shifting the Perspective of Family Medicine Training

Andrea Gordon, MD; Michele Birch, MD

05/1/16 7:15 AM - 8:15 AM Grand Ballroom

Wellness is not the absence of illness, and treating illness does not assure wellness. Those of us who trained in a disease-oriented model must learn to think beyond the medical issue at hand, considering the patient’s underlying needs and self-definition of being well. By training teachers and role models, including nurses and physician assistants, in wellness care for themselves and our patients, we can authentically train learners to address whole-person wellness. This will allow us to expand the Triple Aim of better care and health at lower cost to the quadruple aim, one that also includes the wellness of clinicians. The Tufts and Carolinas residency programs are changing our cultures of teaching to emphasize that there are many paths to a sense of well-being. As faculty, nurses, and other providers such as PAs embody this approach to patients who are also seen by residents our clinics become a demonstration of the value of seeking wellness rather than illness.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Define wellness and how it might appear in their patients and themselves.
  2. Demonstrate their understanding by contrasting conventional illness-based approaches to anxiety and hypertension with a model that embraces wellness.
  3. Brainstorm how to change one aspect of their curriculum or program culture to shift toward a wellness paradigm, potentially using examples and resources presented.

B005 Writing for Success: Publishing in the Medical Literature

Charles Ponte, PharmD

05/1/16 7:15 AM - 8:15 AM Grand Ballroom

Academic family medicine program administrators must ensure the success of their faculty. The universally accepted yardstick of success is typically promotion and/or tenure. The academy must provide the infrastructure that nourishes professional growth and allows its members to develop their strengths. Academic appointments carry the requirement that promotion is contingent upon building a successful track record of scholarly productivity. This interactive faculty development session will explore the importance of scholarship to academic success and describe the various internal and external barriers that negatively impact scholarly productivity. The session will conclude with a discussion of strategies that could assist the clinician/educator in overcoming writing inertia and scholarly ineffectiveness.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Recognize the need for scholarship as a measure of academic success.
  2. Describe the barriers that interfere with scholarly productivity.
  3. Develop strategies to overcome writing inertia and scholarly ineffectiveness.

B006 “Espirit de Corps:” Strengthening Organizational Morale as a Resource in High-Change Environments

Deborah Taylor, PhD; Donald Woolever, MD

05/1/16 7:15 AM - 8:15 AM Grand Ballroom

Does your family medicine residency or department seem undetectable on the “morale” meter for days, weeks, or months at a time? Do you and/or your colleagues start your workday with a spring in your step and end the day slumped in your chair? If you answered yes (or maybe) to these questions, this seminar is for you! What is known about morale as it relates to well-being, job satisfaction, productivity, work quality, and embracing/promoting change will be presented. Experiential (individual and small/large group) exercises will be the cornerstone of this seminar. You will leave with a PMP (Personal Morale Plan) as well as a packaged seminar including tools to bring back to present to faculty, residents, and staff in your residency or department.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Appreciate the impact of morale on personal and relationship systems (residency, medical school department, etc.) well-being.
  2. Recognize two ways you enhance and two ways you do detract from your own as well as other’s morale in your educational or practice setting.
  3. Develop a Personal Morale Plan (PMP) to include at least one specific morale-boosting behavioral change you will undertake upon returning to your department or program.

B007 Integrating Doctorate Level Psychology Practicum Students Into a Primary Care Residency Clinic

James Shaw

05/1/16 7:15 AM - 8:15 AM Grand Ballroom

Integration among different disciplines to provide patient care is the basis for the patient-centered medical home. We are planning to discuss our model for integrating clinical psychology PhD trainees into a family medicine residency program. Our family medicine residency is a patient-centered medical home. The latest research in psychotherapy duration and modality supports the benefits of this collaboration. Our model provides for longer most cost effective therapies using this integrated approach with the patient’s needs being primary.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe the latest research on the differences between different lengths and different therapeutic approaches of psychotherapy sessions.
  2. Describe the latest research on integrating psychotherapy with primary care settings and residency programs.
  3. Describe how integrating doctorate level psychology trainees can enhance a primary care residency program.

B008 Teaching Coding and Why Residents Should Care

Jen Flament, MD

05/1/16 7:15 AM - 8:15 AM Grand Ballroom

Whether entering private practice or working in a safety net clinic, physician coding and billing is an essential skill yet it is often poorly taught and generally undervalued. Studies looking at coding among primary care physicians have found high percentages of errors that undoubtedly began with poor comprehension of coding during training. Incorrect coding is also a widely recognized cause for lost revenue in residency settings, which is problematic in primary care settings where margins are typically small. Understandably, residents put a greater emphasis on learning clinical skills, but effective strategies for teaching coding and billing are essential in training independent, competent physicians. This roundtable discussion is an opportunity to discuss common challenges, share teaching methods and resources, and improve coding accuracy among trainees.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Identify areas within each participant's residency where coding and billing training could improve.
  2. Describe several effective methods and resources for teaching residents coding and billing.
  3. Determine which methods are best suited to addressing each residency's area of need.

B009 Achieving Osteopathic Recognition in a Family Medicine Residency Program

Lindsey Faucette, DO; Natalie Nevins, DO, MSHPE

05/1/16 7:15 AM - 8:15 AM Grand Ballroom

Our aim for this this discussion is to share best practices for meeting requirements of Osteopathic Recognition through structured didactic programs and networking via online learning community. We will also discuss best practices for assessing osteopathic resident learners reactions, skills, behaviors, as well as check-list based competency assessments.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Identify pathway to achieving Osteopathic Recognition (OR), as well as possible program deficiencies to achieving OR.
  2. Create a model for implementing Osteopathic Core Curriculum at their home site.
  3. Articulate appropriate use of evaluation forms in assessing osteopathic competencies in resident learners.

B010 How Can Student Involvement in a Student-Run Free Clinic Increase Interest in Family Medicine?

Charlotte Paolini, DO; Paul Pikman; Anjuli Maharaj; Daniel Moses

05/1/16 7:15 AM - 8:15 AM Grand Ballroom

A current focus of American medical schools is addressing the projected shortage of primary care physicians. By creating a mission of training students to pursue such fields as family medicine, new medical schools are working to bridge this gap in health care. Despite this, students continue to gravitate toward subspecialty medical fields. A potentially underestimated tool in developing student interest in family medicine is the opportunity to work in a Student-Run Free Clinic (SRFC) during the didactic years of medical school. This session will describe the development of an SRFC at Campbell University School of Osteopathic Medicine, and in particular, the involvement of the Family Medicine Interest Group in its formation and operation. Through sharing experiences and ideas, family medicine faculty can adopt strategies to generate interest in family medicine through participation in an SRFC.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Identify the need for increased student interest in family medicine
  2. Describe how a student-run free clinic relates to family medicine interest among students.
  3. Propose strategies for developing a student-run free clinic and generating the student interest necessary to make it a success.

B011 The Patient-Centered Medical Home Experience: Integrating Residency Orientation With a Clinical Rotation for Optimization

Lance Fuchs, MD

05/1/16 7:15 AM - 8:15 AM Grand Ballroom

All family medicine residencies struggle with how to orient new residents in a thorough and efficient manner. Every program has to decide what topics to cover and how to present a large volume of new material in a short amount of time. The Kaiser Permanente San Diego Family Medicine Residency has combined its 2-week orientation process with a 4-week patient-centered medical home clinical block rotation for our new intern classes during the past 4 years. The six new interns are all together for their first 6 weeks of residency. Our combined orientation and clinical experience improves bonding, sets a solid foundation in outpatient clinical practice and community service, and enhances training focused on the patient-centered medical home model and the Triple Aim. The purpose of this roundtable discussion is to discuss strategies to optimize the quality of the new resident orientation process and to improve new resident education on the patient-centered medical home model and the Triple Aim (better care, better health, lower cost).

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Learn strategies to optimize the quality of the new resident orientation process.
  2. Learn strategies to improve new resident education on the important features of the patient-centered medical home model
  3. Learn strategies to teach new residents the Triple Aim (better care, better health, lower cost)

B012 The Engage Initiative: Five Key Ingredients for Perfectly SPICED Seminars

Melissa Stiles, MD; Thomas Hahn, MD; Andrea Martonffy, MD; Magnolia Larson, DO; Jenny White

05/1/16 7:15 AM - 8:15 AM Grand Ballroom

Engage is an initiative to improve residency seminar teaching to ensure that seminars have six core components (SPICED): Stimulating, Problem-based, Interactive, Community, and Patient-Centered, Evidence-Based, and address issues of health care Disparity. In January 2015, a survey was given to residents and faculty to prioritize faculty development needs on the core components. Faculty development sessions are now in process, and the survey will be repeated in the winter of 2016. The seminar evaluations have also been revised to reflect the core components so that speakers can get more specific feedback. The top three areas where faculty felt they could benefit from more instruction are interactive learning techniques, EBM skills, and incorporating community medicine principles into seminars. Residents identified community medicine principles and interactive and problem-based learning as the priority areas.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Recognize the SPICED core components of effective seminars/lectures: stimulating, interactive, evidence-based, problem-based, patient and community-centered, and assess heath care disparity.
  2. Design evaluations to assess inclusion of the SPICED core components in seminars.
  3. List three ways in which didactic time at the participants institution could be changed to better align with ENGAGE principles.


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